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Winners of Jane Drew and Ada Louise Huxtable prizes revealed

American architect Elizabeth Diller and Swiss-French photographer Hélène Binet recognised by Women in Architecture awards

Dillerbinet

Dillerbinet

L-R; Elizabeth Diller, photograph by Georgie Wood, and Hélène Binet, photograph by Alessandra Trainiti

American architect and founding partner of Diller Scofidio + Renfro is the winner of the 2019 Jane Drew Prize, an award recognising an architectural designer who, through their work and commitment to design excellence, has raised the profile of women in architecture.

Founded in 1981, Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DS+R) focusses on cultural and civic projects, addressing the changing role of institutions and the future of cities. The studio is based in New York and employs more than 100 architects, designers, artists and researchers, now led by four partners—Elizabeth Diller, Ricardo Scofidio, Charles Renfro and Benjamin Gilmartin. In 1999 Diller received the MacArthur Foundation ‘Genius’ Grant, the first given in the field of architecture. She is a Professor of Architecture at Princeton University and a Visiting Professor at the Bartlett School of Architecture. She lead the Grand Jury for the 2018 RIBA International Prize. In 2018 she was named in Time Magazine’s list of the most influential people of the year for the second time.

The High Line

The High Line

Source: courtesy of diller scofidio and renfro

The High Line, in collaboration with James Corner Field Operations and Piet Oudolf, is a new 1.5–mile long public park built on an abandoned elevated railroad stretching from the Meatpacking District to the Hudson Rail Yards in Manhattan.

The High Line, in collaboration with James Corner Field Operations and Piet Oudolf, completed in 2014, sensitively and creatively rejuvenated an abandoned elevated railroad stretching from the Meatpacking District to the Hudson Rail Yards in Manhattan, New York, and set a precedent for similar urban rehabilitation projects in cities around the world. Both Los Angeles’ The Broad contemporary art museum and New York’s Roy and Diana Vagelos Education Center (opened respectively in 2015 and 2016 and for which Diller was partner-in-charge) testify to Edwin Heathcote’s attribution of Diller as ‘one of architecture’s most articulate voices’ and exemplify the creative and innovative expression within established typologies that the practice is known for.

The Broad

The Broad

Source: courtesy of diller scofidio and renfro

The Broad is a new contemporary art museum founded by philanthropists Eli and Edythe Broad on Grand Avenue in downtown Los Angeles

Recent competition wins and ongoing commissions – including the V&A Collection and Research Centre in Stratford, the Centre for Music on the site of the old Museum of London and the Adelaide Contemporary, providing a new home for the Art Gallery of South Australia – evidence an enduring commitment to the design of tomorrow’s cultural institutions.

Elizabeth Diller said: ‘It is a great honour to be awarded the Jane Drew Prize 2018, and to join such an amazing group of women that came before. I’m very touched.’

Roy and Diana Vagelos Education Center

Roy and Diana Vagelos Education Center

Source: courtesy of diller scofidio and renfro

Roy and Diana Vagelos Education Center

Swiss-French photographer Hélène Binet is the winner of the 2019 Ada Louise Huxtable Prize, which recognises individuals working in the wider architectural industry who have made a significant contribution to architecture and the built environment.

Daniel Libeskind's Jewish Museum, Berlin, Germany by Hélène Binet

Daniel Libeskind’s Jewish Museum, Berlin, Germany by Hélène Binet

Source: courtesy of ammann gallery

Daniel Libeskind’s Jewish Museum, Berlin, Germany by Hélène Binet

Best known for her evocative black and white photographs – especially working with architects Daniel Libeskind, Peter Zumthor and Zaha Hadid – she has published more than a dozen books of her own work and on the works of, amongst others, Le Corbusier, Alvar Aalto, Sigurd Lewerentz. In 2007 she was awarded an Honorary Fellowship of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). She has given lectures at numerous institutions including the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University, and the Architectural Association, London. Her work has been exhibited internationally since 1989 and is held in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), New York. Most recently she was honored with the Julius Shulman Institute Excellence in Photography Award in 2015.

Binet’s work explores the relationship of light and space. She is an advocate of analogue photography and works exclusively with film, celebrating the limitations of the medium and the inability of post-production editing. Her carefully considered details – or fragments – of buildings are often attributed as emotional and with a deep feeling of materiality that captures space imbued with possibility and imagination.

Hélène Binet said: ‘It is wonderful to be put forward for this award, and it is an honour to be among such wonderful ladies.’

Peter Zumthor's Bruder Klaus Kapelle, Mechernich, Germany, by Hélène Binet

Peter Zumthor’s Bruder Klaus Kapelle, Mechernich, Germany, by Hélène Binet

Source: courtesy of ammann gallery

Peter Zumthor’s Bruder Klaus Kapelle, Mechernich, Germany, by Hélène Binet

The Women in Architecture awards, in association with The Architectural Review and The Architects’ Journal, look to inspire change in the architectural profession by celebrating great design by women architects from around the world and promoting role models for young women in practice.

Women in Architecture luncheon

Diller and Binet will both be speaking at the AJ/AR Women in Architecture luncheon at the Savoy on Friday 1 March, where the winners of the Architect of the Year and Moira Gemmill Prize for Emerging Architecture will be announced – click here to view the shortlists, and here to book your seat at the event.

The Jane Drew Prize
A spirited advocate for women in a male-dominated profession, Jane Drew graduated from the Architectural Association in 1929 into a profession that was unwelcoming to women at best. She started her own practice after the Second World War, and her work played a substantial role in introducing the Modern Movement into the UK. Last year, the prize was given to fearless female icon Denise Scott Brown as she is still fighting against a culture that assigned Venturi to the canon without her. Previous winners include Odile Decq, Grafton Architects’ founders Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara, Zaha Hadid, Kathryn Findlay of Ushida Findlay and Eva Jiřičná.

The Ada Louise Huxtable Prize
Ada Louise Huxtable made history by being the first full-time architecture critic at a US newspaper when she joined the New York Times, and was later awarded the first Pulitzer Prize for Criticism in 1970. Sculptor Rachel Whiteread won the 2017 award for interrogating and materialising our psychic response to space through her artwork, exploring the universal in the particular. As critic Anthony Vidler put it, she is ‘faithful to a truly architectural project’. Former Serpentine Galleries director Julia Peyton-Jones and client and architectural patron Jane Priestman are previous recipients of the accolade, in 2016 and 2015 respectively.