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Headline

‘Competitions offer terrible odds for a pretty lean return’

Comment

An excellent article well stated. Public clients have also been shown to spend c. 25% of total competition economic costs. This accumulates rapidly to staggering sums that might better be spent on what’s being built - with more and better value quality projects, and better working conditions for those employed on them. Because such competition processes aren’t required in the private sector, where any appointment process can be considered, there is no level playing field. Consequently, those seeking to provide much needed public service and investment are at an economic disadvantage which disincentivises public work, and public bodies from being able to afford it. For far too long outsourcing of public service design has been plagued by competition(s) and its time to question this model’s fundamental logic. Processes are expensive and complex, competitions threshold values are far too low, and there is a predisposition towards the ideology of competition that’s frequently skewed to cost and not value, rather than collaboration. Are such proscribed competitions necessarily at the heart of everything that’s good, fair, accessible and delivers best value? The profession and RIBA urgently need to move forward this matter.

Posted date

22 July, 2019

Posted time

1:45 pm

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