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Headline

Michael Heseltine: ‘Put residents in charge of estate regeneration’

Comment

Oh dear, where to start with this issue? Three paragraphs devoted to how Michael Heseltine inconvenienced the AJ photographer, another repetition of the story about the ceremonial mace, but nothing to say about the confession by the man placed at the head of our national estate regeneration strategy that he was ‘surprised to hear’ about what is happening at the Heygate and Aylesbury estates. For future reference, the question the cutting-edge journalists at the AJ should have asked is: how does the enforced eviction of thousands of residents from these and other estates conform with with Heseltine’s statement that estate regeneration should be ‘resident led’? Instead, we get the unquestioned reporting of the usual platitudes about ‘putting residents at the heart of shaping their estates’. We would suggest the question on everyone’s lips here would be: then why has neither the Estate Regeneration National Strategy nor the GLA’s Draft Good Practice Guide to Estate Regeneration made resident support a condition of such regeneration – which as we know in practice means demolition? And why you’re at it, perhaps another question you may have liked to have asked Lord Heseltine (in between listing the architects he likes best) is how demolished estates are meant to remain in public hands when the government has allocated a mere £140 million for the ‘Blitz’ on 100 estates, and he himself says the money will come from the private sector? His suggestion that it will come from the local authorities his Party have deliberately starved of funding is, of course, another meaningless statement this article fails to challenge. What else? Perhaps ask why a man with an estimated fortune of £264 million – who has never lived on, known anyone who has lived on, or visited a council estate without a retinue of bodyguards – is in charge of the nation’s estate regeneration strategy? Or whether his justification for the demolition of Robin Hood Gardens estate because he ‘doesn’t like the look of it’ is a criterion he will be applying to the 100 as-yet unidentified estates his panel intends to ‘Blitz’? But let’s pass on to the other burning (but apparently unrelated topic) of this edition of the AJ – MIPIM, the International Market for Real Estate Professionals. The subject of both Will Hurst’s editorial and its own article, this, it seems, is where our post-Brexit architectural practices must go now to sell their services to the world. Unfortunately, neither editorial nor article mention what is also being sold at MIPIM. Even in that little bubble where the AJ editorial board meets to discuss world affairs over sushi, it can’t have escaped your notice that the Haringey Development Vehicle that was announced this week, and which will demolish thousands of council homes on Broadwater Farm, Northumberland Park and Sky City estates, was brokered at MIPIM. Or that the development partner selected by Haringey Labour council for this mass privatisation scheme is Lendlease, whose comparable deal with Southwark Labour council for the demolition and redevelopment of the Heygate estate was also cut at MIPIM. While celebrating MIPIM as the panacea for all those lost commissions for British architects, perhaps the AJ would like to reflect on where the land for all these new projects is being found? You excitedly announce that 2,000 architects will be in attendance next week; but what you fail to mention is how many Leaders of London councils – accompanied by their Cabinet Members for Housing and Regeneration, regeneration officers from the private sector, advisors from Savills, and of course members of the national estate regeneration panel headed by Heseltine – will also be there, selling off the land on which the homes of hundreds of thousands of council tenants live. It is on the mass eviction of these residents, and the privatisation of the land their homes are built on, that the commissions British architects win next week in Cannes will be built. Is this not something your readers in the profession – who in our experience are ostrich-like in their ignorance of estate demolition – should be told about? Or would they rather hear about what colour jumper Tarzan was wearing? Simon Elmer Architects for Social Housing

Posted date

12 March, 2017

Posted time

10:35 am

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