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Peter Phillips

Recent activity

Comments (19)

  • Comment on: Architects slam shipping containers to house the homeless

    Peter Phillips's comment 26 August, 2019 4:50 pm

    As usual the root cause of the housing problem isn't stated, either in the article or by commenters. Oooh, too sensitive an issue, but problems can never be solved unless the causes are acknowledged and addressed.

  • Comment on: Who’s favourite to win this year’s RIBA Stirling Prize?

    Peter Phillips's comment 19 July, 2019 5:31 pm

    As an occasional user of London Bridge Station I acknowledge that the remodeling of the station is an attractive and very welcome improvement. However it is spoiled by having island canopies rather than an overall glazed canopy over the platforms and tracks. In the winter the platforms are very exposed to cold winds and rain principally because the tracks and platforms are elevated. However this is made worse by the substantial open areas over the tracks, and the canopies being unduly high and not extending to the platform edges (let alone overhanging them). This is even worse where parts of the canopies have (currently fashionable) wavy roofs which rise up, increasing the exposure to the elements still further. The platform environment is really unpleasant in winter!

    The concourse areas below the platforms and tracks are attractive and spacious, and the the pedestrian circulation well thought out and well connected to the rest of the station and tube lines. However the unpleasant exposure of the platforms is a major deficiency of the project in my view which should be sufficient to prevent it from being awarded the Stirling Prize on this occasion.

    If the canopies are strong enough and the silly wavy bits were replaced with level parts however, and it was possible to install lightweight glazing over the tracks, spanning between the canopy edges, then the project WOULD, in my opinion, be worthy of the prize in a future year.

  • Comment on: RIBA Stirling Prize 2019 shortlist announced

    Peter Phillips's comment 19 July, 2019 5:24 pm

    As an occasional user of London Bridge Station I acknowledge that the remodeling of the station is an attractive and very welcome improvement. However it is spoiled by having island canopies rather than an overall glazed canopy over the platforms and tracks. In the winter the platforms are very exposed to cold winds and rain principally because the tracks and platforms are elevated. However this is made worse by the substantial open areas over the tracks, and the canopies being unduly high and not extending to the platform edges (let alone overhanging them). This is even worse where parts of the canopies have (currently fashionable) wavy roofs which rise up, increasing the exposure to the elements still further.

    The concourse areas below the platforms and tracks are attractive and spacious, and the the pedestrian circulation well thought out and well connected to the rest of the station and tube lines. However the unpleasant exposure of the platforms is a major deficiency of the project in my view which should be sufficient to prevent it from being awarded the Stirling Prize on this occasion.

    If the canopies are strong enough and the silly wavy bits were replaced with level parts however, and it was possible to install lightweight glazing over the tracks, spanning between the canopy edges, then the project WOULD, in my opinion, be worthy of the prize in a future year.

  • Comment on: First-ever national housing audit hopes to push design up the agenda

    Peter Phillips's comment 18 June, 2019 11:41 am

    Heard it all before - similar mantras decade after decade. What WOULD improve mass housing, for sure, would be mandatory minimum space standards for all housing, public and private. The1960's 'Parker Morris' standards (which only applied to public housing) would be a start, though I would like to see larger standards than that. We should also return to a mandatory minium ceiling height of 2.4 or more, 2.5 metres perhaps. Removal of the 2.4m building regulation minimum occurred under Michael Hesltine's watch when he was Environment Minister (or whatever the position was called then) in the 1980s.

  • Comment on: Scruton sacked as chair of beauty watchdog over ‘unacceptable comments’

    Peter Phillips's comment 15 April, 2019 3:46 pm

    In addition to the poinsts Atticus raised, the editor of the New Statesman omitted the full context of what Roger Scruton said in the interview. Clearly referring to the Chinese Communist Party Scruton actually said:

    “They’re creating robots out of their own people by so constraining what can be done. Each Chinese person is a kind of replica of the next one and that is a very frightening thing.”

    That completely changes what he is said to have said, which was an entirely a justifiable statement given the reality of severe and worsening restrictions on freedom of speech,and access to the internet in China.
    Later challenged about the omission, the editor, a typically deceitful extreme left winger, George Eaton, tweeted that he "had to leave the first sentence out of the print edition for reasons of space".

    Yeh, very convincing.

    I thought the creation of this Beauty Watchdog was a strange idea from the beginning and I have no idea what it is supposed to achieve or how, but given that it exists, Scruton should be reinstated immediately and the two weak politically-correct (supposedly conservative) politicians who summarily called for his sacking before hearing Scruton's side of the story, should apologise to him.

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