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Southwark approves yet another Old Kent Road tower

  • 3 Comments

Southwark Council has given the go-ahead for yet another tower on the Old Kent Road in south-east London after approving a third Maccreanor Lavington scheme within the district’s huge regeneration area

The decision means there are now at least 15 consented buildings with 19 storeys or more in and around the south-east London road. Seven of these buildings will stand at least 39 storeys tall. 

Maccreanor Lavington’s latest project is an £80 million mixed-used development which will reach a height of 28 storeys, rising from a six-storey horseshoe-shaped podium. 

Sitting within the Old Kent Road Area Action Plan, the site at 227-255 Ilderton Road is classified as strategic industrial land and, as well as creating 253 homes, the new building will re-provide a double-height food storage and distribution warehouse  

In total the scheme will have 3,600m² of warehouse space for food distributor Leathems, while 171 of the homes will be for private sale. 

Gerard Maccreanor, founding director of Maccreanor Lavington, said: ‘The Old Kent Road is one of the most exciting regeneration projects in London. Colin Wilson’s team at Southwark are really achieving momentum in the area and the Bakerloo Line extension will surely follow.

’The area has character and a rich industrial past. It is exciting to be delivering mixed use projects that hold the ingredients of a future vibrant city neighbourhood.’

A future timeframe for the scheme is not yet known.

Earlier this month Southwark gave permission for 262 homes across a 19 and 10 storey building designed by Farrells, as well as approving a hyrbid application including a 39-storey tower by Allies and Morrison. 

Consented schemes around Old Kent Road

HLM – 387-399 Rotherhithe New Road, 158 homes with a 19 storey tower; completed

rotherhithe new road hlm

rotherhithe new road hlm

Source: HLM

Pilbrow & Partners – Southernwood Retail Park, 724 homes in a building rising to 48 storeys; application consented

View from albany road at the junction of shorncliffe road ©pilbrow & partners

View from albany road at the junction of shorncliffe road ©pilbrow & partners

Source: Pilbrow & Partners

Levitt Bernstein – 634-636 Old Kent Road, 42 homes in six-storey building; application consented

levitt bernsteil old kent road

levitt bernsteil old kent road

Source: Levitt Bernstein

Rolfe Judd – Berkeley Malt Street, 1,050 homes across 11 buildings ranging from five to 44 storeys; application consented

malt street rolfe judd

malt street rolfe judd

Source: Rolfe Judd

HKR – Nye’s Wharf, 153 homes across nine storeys; application consented

nye wharf

nye wharf

Source: HKR

HKR – 49-53 Glengall Road, 181 homes in 13-storey building; application consented

hkr glengall cgi03 03+altered+ac

hkr glengall cgi03 03+altered+ac

Source: HKR

Farrells – Ruby Triangle, 1,152 homes in towers standing at 17, 30, 40 and 48 storeys tall; application consented

ruby triangle farrells

ruby triangle farrells

Source: Farrells

Farrells – 651-657 Old Kent Road, 262 homes across a 19 and 10 storey building; application consented

rtr v43 copy18

651-657 Old Kent Road

Source: Farrells

Farrells’ 651-657 Old Kent Road

Maccreanor Lavington – Ruby Street, 111 homes across 22-storey building; application consented

view 02 upadted rev e

view 02 upadted rev e

Source: Maccreanor Lavington

Maccreanor Lavington’s 22-storey scheme on Old Kent Road

Maccreanor Lavington – 227-255 Ilderton Road, 253 homes in a 28-storey tower; application consented

1906 02 08

1906 02 08

Source: Maccreanor Lavington 

Maccreanor Lavington – Old Kent Road Civic Centre and Livesey Place, 372 homes across three blocks, the tallest at 39-storeys

macc lav

macc lav

Source: Maccreanor Lavington

SPAARC – 6-12 Verney Road, 338 homes in three towers rising from 16 to 22 storeys; application consented

6 12 verney road southwark spparc

6 12 verney road southwark spparc

Source: SPPARC

Brisac Gonzalez – Cantium Retail Park, 1,113 homes with towers standing at 48, 37 and 26 storeys tall; application consented

Brisac gonzalez old kent

Brisac gonzalez old kent

Source: Brisac Gonzalez

AHMM – London Square Bermondsey, gallery and 406 homes; consented

london square bermondsey

london square bermondsey

Source: Allford Hall Monaghan Morris

Allies & Morrison – Devonshire Square, largest building is 39 storeys, 365 homes across the scheme; hybrid application consented 

view from devonshire grove

view from devonshire grove

Source: Allies & Morrison

 

  • 3 Comments

Readers' comments (3)

  • A difficult context. All these schemes are in part contingent on the Bakerloo Line being extended...which is becoming increasingly difficult to call on a predictable timescale. Although the Southwark strategy to make the development scale unstopably big seems to get further down the pipeline.
    If the Bakerloo Line extension doesn't happen immenently what then might the alternative be for the land stuck in limbo, over a less predictable timescale.
    The London public may for example rather have free transport again for school children rather than such capital investment & I think I might agree as this contributes more to a sustainable London overall.

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  • The dire financial state of TfL doesn't bode well for the health of what surely must be a phenomenal increase in population density - and the situation is reminiscent of the problems in the early days at Canary Wharf related to delays in completing the Jubilee Line.

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  • Can’t help feeling there may be a high price to pay for these schemes, socially and environmentally assuming they get built in a depression.

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