Unsupported browser

For a better experience please update your browser to its latest version.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Scotland reacts to hung parliament: ‘Hard Brexit is dead’

Nicola sturgeon acn
  • Comment

The Scottish profession has reacted to the UK’s political uncertainty and what it means for Brexit, after a shocking election resulted in a hung parliament 

It was a disastrous night for the the Scottish National Party (SNP) with major players, including former leader Alex Salmond and Angus Robertson, losing their seats.

But, while the SNP’s vote dropped sharply, the Conservatives won 13 seats in Scotland - its best performance in the nation since 1983.

The other two pro-union parties, Labour and the Lib Dems, also made gains, winning seven and four seats each respectively.

Marc Kilkenny of Marc-Kilkenny Architects, which is based in Glasgow and Dublin, said that the election results mean ‘the hard Brexit is dead’.

’Hopefully there can be now some sensible rhetoric coming from Westminster in relation to Brexit negotiations,’ he added. ’While I’m disappointed we won’t have Jeremy Corbyn in Number 10, I’m heartened that decency and positivity did so well against such formidable odds.’

Marc kilkenny team portrait

Marc kilkenny team portrait

Marc Kilkenny and his team at Marc-Kilkenny Architects

Reacting to the news, Ann Nisbet of Ann Nisbet Studio, which is based in Glasgow, said the prospect of a Tory and DUP coalition - which sources report could be formed later today - would be ’extremely unstable and likely to fail’.

’A progressive alliance, if they have the numbers would hopefully steer Scotland and the rest of the UK away from a hard brexit, retaining free movement of people and enabling us to be part of the Common Market,’ Nisbet added.

’However, it’s far more likely that we will be facing another general election within the next couple of months, which continues the current uncertainty for the UK and the industry.’

Malcolm Fraser, who was brought up in Edinburgh, said that, although the way forward now for England was to seek ’the softest, least damaging Norwegian-type Brexit’, he added that the way ahead for Scotland is ‘less clear’.

He added that Scotland ’needs to find its own way forward, in architecture as well as wider politics, to regain its feet’.

In a statement in Edinburgh today [9 June], SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon said that Theresa May has ‘lost all authority and credibility’ following the election results.

She added that the SNP had ‘won’ in Scotland, having won more seats than all the other parties combined.

However, she admitted that the SNP had experienced some ‘bitterly disappointing losses’, particularly with Angus Robertson losing his seat. 

Comments

Marc Kilkeny of Marc-Kilkenny Architects

’Ding, dong hard Brexit is dead. Hopefully there can be now some sensible rhetoric coming from Westminster in relation to Brexit negotiations. While I’m disappointed we won’t have Jeremy Corbyn in Number 10, I’m heartened that decency and positivity did so well against such formidable odds.

’Finally, as a UK and Ireland practice we will be anxiously watching the Brexit negotiations and the economic and political implications on both countries.

Ann Nisbet of Ann Nisbet Studio

’There are a number of scenarios, the first which is likely to be tested is a Tory and DUP coalition, which would be extremely unstable and likely to fail.

’A progressive alliance, if they have the numbers would hopefully steer Scotland and the rest of the UK away from a hard Brexit, retaining free movement of people and enabling us to be part of the common market.  However, it’s far more likely that we will be facing another general election within the next couple of months, which continues the current uncertainty for the UK and the industry.’

’The SNP have seen a reduction in seats in Scotland, however this may not  necessarily mean a lowering of support for a second independence referendum. The Labour gains could reflect an increase in support for the left leaning policies of Corbyn, and not the unionist arguments of Kezia Dugdale and Ruth Davidson.’

Malcolm Fraser, director of Halliday Fraser Munro

’As an optimist I’m touched by the dignified resistance offered by Corbyn – what might have happened were he not monstered by vile press barons and his own Blairite tories? As a pessimist I’m distressed that unionist Scotland has been dragged down into some sort of grumpy, Trumpian little England.

’The way ahead now for England must be to seek the softest, least damaging Norwegian-type Brexit. The way ahead for Scotland is less clear, but I still believe it needs to find its own way forward, in architecture as well as wider politics, to regain its feet.’ 

  • Comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions.

Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.

Related Jobs

AJ Jobs