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Rogers Stirk Harbour confirms job cuts

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Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (RSHP) has confirmed it has made a number of redundancies as part of a ‘significant restructuring’ of the practice

The news came shortly after the 190-strong company opened the doors of its new home in the Leadenhall Building in the city of London, having moved out of its headquarters of the past 30 years at Thames Wharf, Hammersmith.

The job losses mark the largest reshuffle at Richard Rogers’ practice since it let 35 jobs go in 2009 after a number of projects were cancelled due to the economic downturn.

Speaking about the changes, a spokesman said: ‘The practice has undertaken a significant restructuring as part of a wider plan to create more opportunities for all staff to gain experience, develop their skills and progress through the office.

‘In recognition of emerging talent, this includes the promotion of five new partners and nine new associate partners.

‘In order to rebalance the staff profile and roles, there are a very small number of people (under 10) who have left as part of mutual agreements. However, due to contractual constraints, we cannot comment on that issue any further.’

The company’s five new partners including RSHP’s first female partner, Tracy Meller. She was promoted along with Stephen Barrett, Andrew Tyley, Stephen Light and John McElgunn as the practice sought to implement a long-term succession plan to ‘ensure the continuing success of the practice’.

Last year the practice reported a turnover of £32 million and an operating profit of £8 million. In November RSHP won the massive £1 billion project to design a new terminal at Taoyuan International Airport, Taiwan (see AJ 03.11.15).

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