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Moxon brought in on Garden Bridge project

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Moxon Architects has been drafted into work on Thomas Heatherwick’s controversial Garden Bridge project

The practice, which has offices in London and Crathie near Balmoral Castle, has taken on technical aspects and detailed design of the 367m-long span across The Thames, which will be clad in a ‘superstrength’ copper-nickel skin.

Project backer the Garden Bridge Trust said that Moxon’s appointment ‘in no way’ affected the role of Heatherwick Studio, which continued ‘to lead the design’ on the scheme.

Moxon, founded in 2004 by Ben Addy who spent seven years as a key member of Wilkinson Eyre Architects’ bridge team, has already worked on a number of bridges including structures at Deptford Creek and Taunton.

A spokesman for Moxon said: ‘We’ve been engaged alongside our long-term collaborator [engineer] Flint & Neill to provide detailed design development for [preferred contractor] the Bouygues/Cimolai joint venture.’

It is understood the contentious planted bridge, which will be delivered through a design and build contract, will have a £90 million construction value.

Last week newly released correspondence between chancellor George Osborne and London mayor Boris Johnson revealed Johnson’s doubts over Transport for London’s £30 million grant and its decision to underwrite the £3.5 million annual maintenance cost.

The letters show the mayor initially favoured ‘underwriting’ rather than contributing to the construction cost, and said he wanted to see the public sector contribution ‘recovered over time’ through post-completion fundraising by the trust.

But Osborne encouraged Johnson to make TfL’s £30 million contribution a grant rather than a loan, and said the mayor should underwrite maintenance costs if private support could not be found, describing it as a ‘small funding requirement’. 

The full comment from the Garden Bridge Trust:
‘Moxon Architects is part of the joint venture, headed by Bouygues TP and Cimolai, that are preferred contractors for the construction of the Garden Bridge. This in no way affects the role of Heatherwick Studio, which will be continuing to lead the design of the project, working closely with the Garden Bridge Trust. Moxon will be providing additional consultancy support for the joint venture.’

 

  • 4 Comments

Readers' comments (4)

  • The recruitment of Moxon, with their ex-Wilkinson & Eyre partner - and Flint & Neill - will certainly help make up for the blatant skewing of the 'ranking' process that was applied to Heatherwick Studios, but it will do absolutely nothing to legitimise the sheer arrogance of imposing this development on the Thames in the centre of our capital city - and the outrageous diversion of substantial sums of public money to a vanity project by the very person who is driving through a policy of severe and increasing austerity in public spending.

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  • Industry Professional

    Just for clarity GBT hasn't 'drafted in' Moxon. Moxon are part of the Bouygues TP and Cimolai Joint Venture team selected as preferred Main Contractor in April 2015.

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  • But why wasn't Heatherwick been novated to the contractor Bouygues/Cimolai? It's standard practise for a client to require the construction contractor to take on the original architect. Is it because Heatherwick isn't an architect?

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  • The story gets better every day.

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