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Last ‘unaltered part’ of Broadgate faces demolition as listing is ruled out

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The government is set to turn down statutory protection for 1-2 Broadgate, paving the way for another part of the iconic 1980s office complex to be demolished

It is understood the culture minister is ’minded to grant’ landowner British Land’s application for a Certificate of Immunity (COI) from listing for the buildings in the south-west corner of the City of London development.

If the decision goes unchallenged within the 28-day appeal period, British Land will be clear to move forward with its plans to flatten the Arup-designed structures and replace them with a 14-storey office-led building designed by Allford Hall Monaghan Morris.

Historic England, which in 2011 attempted to get the estate Grade II*-listed when the developer asked for immunity certificates for numbers 3,4 and 6 Broadgate, had not recommended 1-2 Broadgate for listing.

A Historic England spokesperson told the AJ: ‘Although the Broadgate development designed by Peter Foggo of Arup Associates was a landmark project of the 1980s, showing considerable quality of design, it has now been diminished by a series of demolitions and alterations of important parts of the original scheme.

Though it has historic interest as the last unaltered fragment it can’t convey the importance of the larger whole

’When considered in isolation, 1-2 Broadgate does not represent one of the best or most important works by Peter Foggo. Its architectural interest was designed to form part of a larger piece of urban place-making and, even though it has historic interest as the last unaltered fragment of Broadgate phases 1-4, it can’t convey the importance of the larger whole.

The  spokesperson added: ‘After careful consideration we have recommended to DCMS that a COI should be issued and the Minister is minded to do so.’

180519 1 2 broadgate public consultation gf cutaway

AHMM’s proposals for 1-2 Broadgate - public consultation image, ground floor cutaway

AHMM’s proposals for 1-2 Broadgate - public consultation image, ground floor cutaway

British Land, working with the Government of Singapore Investment Corporation (GIC), had previously obtained immunity from listing for numbers 1-2 and 8-12 Broadgate, 100 Liverpool Street and the Octagon Arcade.

However immunity from listing for those blocks (granted in early 2013) ran out earlier this year.

The news will not be welcomed by the Twentieth Century Society, which had opposed the COI and supported listing.

British Land and GIC declined to comment. Proposed section of AHMM's plans for 1-2 Broadgate

Proposed section of AHMM’s plans for 1-2 Broadgate

Proposed section of AHMM’s plans for 1-2 Broadgate

Extract from 1-2 Broadgate EIA scoping report

The proposed redevelopment of the site will involve the demolition of the existing building and construction of a ground plus 13-storey building (reaching approximately 74.5m above ordnance datum to deliver a new mixed-use building, comprising a mixture of retail, leisure and ‘competitive socialising’ uses (use classes A1/A3/A4/D2/sui generis) uses at lower levels (LG-2nd floor) with office (Use Class B1) on the upper floor levels (3rd-12th floor). The existing basement level on site will be expanded to cover the same footprint of the proposed building and will be deepened.

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Readers' comments (1)

  • Phil Parker

    Why this fetish of listing buildings?

    Why on earth would you want to keep the existing?

    Only reason I can think is it could just avoid its replacement by something distinctly mediocre.

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