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John Pardey wins planning for three-pavilion farmhouse in Somerset

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John Pardey Architects’ (JPA) design for a £1.2 million contemporary farmhouse in rural Somerset has won planning permission

The practice’s proposals for the Page House, to be built on a 2ha site in Thrupe, near Wells, includes a cluster of three pavilions connected by glazed passageways.

The first wing provides an entrance, study and guest accommodation, the second includes living space while the third contains the bedrooms. 

The different units are arranged to create two distinct courts: an entrance court and a garden court including a Japanese garden.

This former farm site, which has views southwards to the Glastonbury Tor, also has two existing barns, one of which had planning permission to be converted into a house.

However planners supported JPA’s alternative proposals to replace both barns in favour of building an entirely new house.

The architect described the single-storey buildings as a ‘contemporary take on local farm buildings’. Stone was used on the buildings’ façades, external garden walls and chimney, while a dark-stained timber cladding was chosen for fronts of the living and bedroom wings.

The house is expected to complete by summer 2020.

1810 p sketchaxo

1810 p sketchaxo

Project data

Location Thrupe, Somerset
Type of project One-off house
Client Rupert and Alison Page
Architect JPA 
Landscape architect BD Landscape
Start on site date June 2019
Completion date Summer 2020
Contract duration 12 months (approximate)
Gross internal floor area 315m²
Total cost £1.2 million (approximate)

 

  • 1 Comment

Readers' comments (1)

  • So not a farmhouse, in fact - a well designed new house, but it would have been instructive to see what it's replaced.
    And the farming is likely conducted by one of the large agricultural contractors whose sub-rural bases sprawl across bits of otherwise rural landscape (with indeterminate planning status) in stark contrast to all the redundant farm houses and buildings now increasingly being re-imagined as tasteful residences.

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