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In pictures: First look at Crossrail's new stations

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Crossrail has revealed images showing how the route’s 10 new stations will have ’simple and clear’ common features while reflecting local character

The schemes have been drawn up by a pool of architects which includes Weston Williamson, Allies & Morrison, BDP, Wilkinson Eyre and AHR. Only Canary Wharf station designed by Foster + Partners with Adamson Associates has so far completed structurally ahead of the line’s proposed opening in December 2018. 

Billed as Europe’s largest construction project and eventually boasting 40 stations, the 118km route known as the Elizabeth line will run from Berkshire through the capital and out to Essex.

Besides the 10 new central London stations, Crossrail is also revamping 27 surface stations outside of the capital as part of the £14.8 billion project.

Some of these proposals have been criticised for their design quality, with Richard Rogers warning they would fail to live up to the country’s ‘great railway heritage’. He later called for an independent design review of the schemes.

According to Crossrail, the images released today (11 May) ’provide a glimpse of the common features passengers will see at platform level, as well as the bespoke design of the ticket halls and surface areas which will reflect the character of their local areas’.

’The new Farringdon station will take inspiration from the historic local trades of blacksmiths and goldsmiths’

Explaining how the new stations will sit within their different contexts, Crossrail said: ’[The station] at Paddington will echo the design legacy of Brunel’s existing terminus building, while the new Farringdon station will take inspiration from the historic local trades of blacksmiths and goldsmiths, as well as the distinctive architecture of the Barbican’.

At platform level the stations will share common elements such as seating, signage and platform screen doors described as ’consistent and familiar’ to the rest of the TfL network.

A Crossrail spokesman added: ’This common architecture will accentuate the curved, sweeping passageways created during the construction of the tunnels. The design approach aims for simplicity and clarity by reducing visual clutter as far as possible to provide clear lines of sight along the platforms.’

The new designs are also on display in a new exhibition, Platform for Design, at the RIBA in Portland Place along with architectural components destined for the stations. 

Bond Street Crossrail station - proposed upper escalator from Davies Street ticket hall

Bond Street Crossrail station - proposed upper escalator from Davies Street ticket hall

Bond Street station, upper escalator from Davies Street ticket hall. Architect John McAslan + Partners, engineer design WSP, urban realm designs John McAslan + Partners / WPS / Publica

Comment

Andrew Wolstenholme, chief executive, Crossrail
’World class design is at the heart of Crossrail and as the project approaches 75 per cent complete, these fantastic new images show passengers what they will experience when the Elizabeth line opens in 2018.’

Proposed tunnelled platform level concourse on the Ellizabeth Line

Proposed tunnelled platform level concourse on the Ellizabeth Line

Proposed tunnelled platform level concourse on the Elizabeth Line

Julian Robinson, head of architecture, Crossrail
‘The Crossrail project has worked with world-leading architects and designers to deliver a new railway that draws upon the fantastic transport architectural heritage of London and London Underground with each station reflecting the distinct character of the surrounding area and presenting a common line identity.’ 

  • 2 Comments

Readers' comments (2)

  • Chris Rogers

    Looks like many of Crossrail's "simple and clear common features" will be acres of dull grey tiling etc, one of the common flaws of all recent Tfl work - see the many new tunnels at Kings Cross/St Pancras, especially

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  • 'Will run from Buckinghamshire' - are you sure it's being built in the right place? Reading and Maidenhead are both in Berkshire.

    Ellizabeth line - too many ls, HM will not be pleased, only she has II.

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  • Thanks for pointing out these errors - they have now been fixed.

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