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Henley Halebrown wins go-ahead for Hackney housing double

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Recently rebranded practice Henley Halebrown has won permission for a pair of residential schemes on the edge of the post-war Frampton Park Estate in Hackney, east London

The firm, which has changed named from Henley Halebrown Rorrison following Ken Rorrison’s decision to retire in April, has designed two new buildings, providing 45 mixed-tenure homes.

The £5 million Frampton Arms scheme in Well Street replaces a former pub and has been conceived as a collection of ‘urban artefacts’ which includes ‘bridges within the composition … to create a sense of drama and delight’.

Described as ‘a palazzo in miniature’, the nearby £7 million Lyttleton House project will sit on a polygonal island site occupied by a two-storey deck access building.

Both developments form part of a 10-year programme of direct investment and regeneration by Hackney Council to provide more than 3,000 homes across 18 sites in the borough.

Both schemes will go out to tender later this year.

FRAMPTON ARMS

Location Well Street, Hackney, London E9
Type of project Housing
Client London Borough of Hackney Estate Regeneration
Architect Henley Halebrown
Landscape architect Townshend Landscape Architects
Planning consultant CMA Planning
Structural engineer Peter Brett Associates
M&E consultant Peter Brett Associates
Quantity surveyor Pellings
Planning supervisor/ principal designer (CDM) Pellings
Main contractor TBC
Tender Date Late 2016
Start on site TBC
Completion TBC
Contract duration TBC
Gross internal floor area 2,100m²
Form of contract Design and Build
Estimated construction cost About £5 million

Historically, Well Street was clearly defined by the frontages of terraced houses. The original building line can still be seen nearby.

The scheme consists of three, five-storey villas similar in area to the existing villas opposite. The middle one is situated symmetrically between two existing linear blocks of flats – Sherard House and Catesby House – allowing visual and physical connections between the new courtyard that the scheme creates and the street. The objective is to repair the relationship between estate and street.

Inside, the lower two floors accommodate two-storey family houses with front doors to the street. New entrances are distributed to reactivate the public realm. The upper floors are a mix of lateral and duplex apartments. These simple buildings are each distinguished by the addition of a loggia combining gallery access and amenity space, orientated towards the landscape, be it the new courtyard, or to the east or west.

The new courtyard incorporates private and communal gardens, play space and parking.

9 1308 Frampton Model Sept 16

LYTTELTON HOUSE

Location Well Street, Hackney, London E9
Type of project Housing
Client London Borough of Hackney Estate Regeneration
Architect Henley Halebrown
Landscape architect Townshend Landscape Architects
Planning consultant CMA Planning
Structural engineer Peter Brett Associates
M&E consultant Peter Brett Associates
Quantity surveyor Pellings
Planning supervisor/ principal designer (CDM) Pellings
Main contractor TBC
Funding N/A
Tender date Late 2016
Start on site TBC
Completion TBC
Contract duration TBC
Gross internal floor area 2,500m²
Form of contract Design and Build
Estimated construction cost about £7 million

The five-storey masonry building occupies the whole of its polygonal island site and is slightly raised from Well Street. It replaces a two-storey deck access ‘house’ currently marooned in green open space. The objective is to repair the relationship between estate and street.

In the 19th Century this end of Well Street and Cambridge Passage was distinguished by continuous building frontages following the street geometry, lost through subsequent development. Our proposal seeks to reinstate this and to highlight the curvature of the street by inflecting it to a greater degree. The massing, although higher than the surrounding buildings, marks the corner and seeks to ‘re-urbanise’ this section of Well Street.

Inside, the lower three floors accommodate lateral apartments screened by loggias and served by a central hall. The top two floors are laid out as houses around an open courtyard.

9 1308 Lyttelton Model Sept 16

 

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