Unsupported browser

For a better experience please update your browser to its latest version.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Forensic Architecture shortlisted for 2018 Turner Prize

  • 3 Comments

A research-led architecture practice has been shortlisted for the Turner Prize for its exhibitions of investigative work into incidents including alleged race-motivated murder

Forensic Architecture, which operates from Goldsmiths at the University of London and was founded by British-Israeli architect Eyal Weizman, was today (26 April) named as one of four in the running for the prestigious art award.

Last month the AJ reported that Forensic Architecture was building a three-dimensional model of how fire spread through Grenfell Tower.

Eyal Weizman - architect, professor of spatial and visual cultures at Goldsmiths, University of London and director of Forensic Architecture

Eyal Weizman - architect, professor of spatial and visual cultures at Goldsmiths, University of London and director of Forensic Architecture

Read the AJ’s exclusive interview with Forensic Architecture’s Eyal Weizman

The practice’s work will be displayed at Tate Britain from September this year until January 2019 alongside exhibits from the other three shortlisted entrants – Naeem Mohaiemen, Charlotte Prodger and Luke Willis Thompson.

Tate Britain said Forensic Architecture was chosen for its work at the documenta 14 art show and for its own exhibitions, including Counter Investigations: Forensic Architecture at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London. This presented a selection of the practice’s recent investigations, including one into the death of a man in Kassel, Germany, and of migrants in the Mediterranean Sea.

The jury praised Forensic Architecture for developing ‘highly innovative methods for sourcing and visualising evidence relating to human rights abuses around the world, used in courts of law as well as exhibitions of art and architecture’, Tate Britain said.

A winner will be announced at an awards ceremony to be broadcast live on BBC TV in December.

It is the second time an architectural practice has been nominated for the £40,000 art prize. In 2015 East London architecture outfit Assemble, at the time an 18-strong collective, became the first architecture practice to win the accolade (pictured below). The firm was chosen ahead of three London-based female artists – Bonnie Camplin, Janice Kerbel, and Nicole Wermers – for its work with local residents in regenerating the rundown Granby Four Streets estate in Liverpool. After fighting demolition plans, locals formed a community land trust and brought in the emerging practice to help improve the houses and neighbourhood.

Assemble winning the Turner Prize in Glasgow, 2015

Assemble winning the Turner Prize in Glasgow, 2015

Assemble winning the Turner Prize in Glasgow, 2015 

  • 3 Comments

Readers' comments (3)

  • ....and the Stirling prize winner receives £....

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Congratulations to Forensic - this is an inspiring message and a ray of hope for more ethical and socially engaged work. My practice, Fluid, is also working with a very large cohort of architectural practices to co-produce ideas for the future of the Lancaster West estate, which has the dreadful charred remains of the Grenfell tower at its heart.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Phil Parker

    I’ve read the AJ piece and even looked at Forensic’s web site and have no idea what they do, but that not to say im not fadcinated by their work and want to know more. Worthy contenders for the Turner, I say. I hope they win.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions.

Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.