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Duncan on Brexit: 'RIBA will ensure architects have strong voice in coming weeks'

Jane Duncan, RIBA president 2015 candidate

RIBA President Jane Duncan has said the institute will work to ensure architects have a ’strong voice in the coming weeks, months and years’ after the UK voted to leave the European Union

Duncan said today’s shock result would ‘clearly’ cause uncertainty about free movement in the EU for architects and students as well as creating doubts about ’trading, material sourcing, inward investment relationships’.

She said the institute would be providing further guidance for its members ‘in due course’ once it had assessed ’the short and longer term effect of the withdrawal’.

The RIBA refused to make any comment before yesterday’s referendum vote - and the impact of a possible Brexit on its members - claiming it was barred from speaking out by rules governing charities.

The country voted by 52 per cent to 48 per cent split in favour of Brexit - a move which had an immediate impact on the markets and caused shares in housebuilders Taylor Wimpey and Persimmon to fall by almost 40 per cent.

Jane Duncan’s statement in full

’The RIBA is a global organisation that supports its members, validates schools of architecture and champions the importance of a quality built environment around the world. UK architecture talent is incredibly resilient and we will continue to ensure that our profession has a bright future, whatever the operating environment.

’Clearly there is uncertainty about the timescales and impact on a range of issues important to our industry including free movement in the EU for architects as well as students, trading and material sourcing, inward investment relationships, EU procurement rules and the effect on the construction sector if restrictions are placed on EU migration.

’In common with other UK businesses and organisations, the RIBA is assessing the short and longer term effect of the withdrawal on our members and the Institute and we will provide further guidance in due course.

’Most importantly, we will work with colleagues in industry and government to ensure that architects have a strong voice in the coming weeks, months and years.’

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