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Cottrell and Vermeulen wins go-ahead for new Hare Krishna centre

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Cottrell and Vermeulen Architecture has won permision for a new community building at an existing Hare Krishna temple in Letchmore Heath, Hertsmere

The 2,167m² project will create a new haveli for the local Hindu community within the grounds of Bhaktivedanta Manor, near Watford, which describes itself as the ‘UK home of the Hare Krishna movement’.

George Harrison, lead guitarist of The Beatles, donated the Grade II-listed property – containing a temple room and shrine within large grounds – to the community in 1973. It is used as a place of worship by the Hindu community, as well as to bless new born children and carry out marriage ceremonies.

Plans include two linked buildings around a courtyard, a dining hall, office space, two classrooms and a new crèche.

Brian Vermeulen, director at Cottrell and Vermeulen Architecture, said: ’Once complete, the haveli will offer a sensitive place for celebration and worship, designed to the specific needs of the Hindu community.’

Work is due to start on site in January 2017, with a completion date set for summer 2018. 

Hare 2

Hare 2

Source: Cottrell and Vermeulen

Temple by Cottrell and Vermeulen

Project data

Location Hertsmere
Type of project Community building
Client ISKCON Foundation
Architect Cottrell and Vermeulen Architecture
Landscape architect Hankinson Duckett Associates
Planning consultant SHR Planning and Property
Structural engineer Engineers HRW
M&E consultant OR Consulting
Quantity surveyor Stockdale
Start on site date January 2017 (tbc)
Completion date Summer 2018
Gross internal floor area 2167.5m²

 

Architects’ view

The haveli’s design is influenced by the 1930s mock Tudor style of the Grade II-listed manor building and surrounding context. The Prasad Hall references the neighbouring ladies Ashram visually, while the function hall appears lower and takes its form from the manor building.

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