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Approval for Guy Hollaway’s country house clause Kent home

  • 3 Comments

Guy Hollaway Architects has won planning for a 360m² country house in Tenterden, Kent, inspired by a medieval deer leap

The Deer House in the High Weald Area of Oustanding Natural Beauty was given the green light by Ashford Borough Council under delegated powers.

The practice relied on paragraph 79 of the revised National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF),  a clause that allows new-build homes to be constructed in open countryside under special circumstances.

According to the London and Hythe-based firm, the concept for the house evolved from the discovery of a deer leap running through the landscape – a sunken fence built into the wall of a forest park which prevented the animals from leaving.

The practice said: ‘The parkland folds up to envelop the house allowing the deer on to the roof while a haha wall allows the occupants to enjoy uninterrupted views of the parkland itself.

‘The dwelling will enable the parkland to return to its former use as a deer farm, allowing the occupants and the deer to co-exist within this environment.’

Work is expected to start on site in summer 2019.

Development images 1

Development images 1

Project data

Location Tenterden, Kent
Type of project Paragraph 79 dwelling
Client Private
Architect Guy Hollaway Architects
Landscape architect – Exterior Architecture
Planning consultant DHA Planning
Quantity surveyor Base Quantum
Funding Private
Tender date Spring 2019
Start on site Spring/summer 2019
Completion Summer 2020
Contract duration Anticipated 1 year
Gross internal floor area 360m²
Form of contract Traditional
Total cost Undisclosed

Section development

Section development

  • 3 Comments

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Readers' comments (3)

  • Basil

    All that glass will bring right into the heart of the house the spectacle of confused deer, children and guests falling to their deaths from the accessible roof onto the concrete slab. The bodies could pile up in that central light well when the owners are on holiday. Exceptional work setting aside Part K. If someone does die, who will be responsible? Really?

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  • Even worse, that beautiful car is going to be severely damaged being bounced up and down the novel access drive with the stepped feature.

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  • MacKenzie Architects

    I'm all for building nice houses for people in the countryside, but the first image didn't look like a sunken anything ... presumably that one wasn't used to promote the case.

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