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A-level results day: number of architecture students rises

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The number of students accepted on to architecture, planning and building courses is at its highest level for five years, according to the higher education admissions service

Figures from UCAS, released to coincide with today’s A-level results, show that UK universities have so far handed places to 6,670 students to study architecture and associated courses this year. This compares to 6,430 at the same stage last year.

The number of confirmed places for students from England – who make up almost two-thirds of the total at 4,190 – has risen by 7 per cent this year.

A further 310 placed students are from Northern Ireland, a 12 per cent rise; while acceptances for people from Scotland have grown 13 per cent to 630. At 180, there is no change in the number of acceptances for applicants from Wales.

A total of 530 successful applicants are from European Union countries aside from the UK – the same number as in 2015, while the number of students accepted from outside the EU has fallen 14 per cent to 830.

Across all subjects, 423,880 students had places in higher education in the UK as of midnight – the highest number recorded on A-level results day.

The final 2016 numbers are likely to change as students find places through the clearing process.

Separate UCAS figures show 43,600 people had applied to study architecture, planning and building courses by the 30 June deadline, after which applicants must go through clearing, a 2 per cent rise on the 2015 figure of 42,860.

Applications from women were up 2 per cent to 17,640, outpacing the percentage increase in applications from men, which grew by 1 per cent to 25,970.

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