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Working details A SEMI-CIRCULAR BAY WINDOW

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BUILDING STUDY

The new brick buildings containing residential accommodation for students are two and three storeys high and enclose a circular and a rectangular courtyard. Student rooms are arranged in groups of five, each with a communal living/ kitchen/dining room which overlooks the courtyard. The communal rooms have bay windows: some triangular, some curved and some - as illustrated on the right - semi-circular.

The main structure consists of loadbearing brick- and blockwork supporting concrete plank floors, with roofs of trussed rafters covered with slates. The bays are set below the eaves of the main building, with lead roofs with wood-cored rolled joints, continuous bands of aluminium windows with panels of untreated cedar boarding below them and spandrel panels of soldier- coursed brickwork. The windows and cedar-boarded panels are faceted to form the curve.

Each roof is supported by two 168mm-diameter steel chs columns which run outside the windows. The column tops have raked steel brackets welded to the web of a 229 x 89mm steel channel, curved to follow the profile of the bay. A header course of engineering bricks sits on the top flange of the channel to form the eaves, with a course of reconstructed-stone cornice blocks above it.

The back of the channel has a bracketed steel angle which supports an inner block leaf on which the timber roof joists rest. The lead roof covering is laid on ply and firrings in radial segments, and forms a curved drip which extends beyond the cornice, allowing space for a meshed ventilation gap. At the back of the bay the lead is dressed into the brickwork of the main building.

The brick spandrel panel - a plinth header course and two soldier courses - rests on a curved steel angle fixed to the steel columns.

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