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Wolfson Prize Garden Cities: URBED's green belt plan

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URBED’s final submission for the 2104 Wolfson Economics Prize proposes a city of 400,000 people, created by doubling the size of an existing town and building on the surrounding green belt

The practice’s vision is centered on the imaginary city of Uxcester, which would see an extra 82,000 homes built over a period of 35 years.

Around 16,000 homes would be constructed within the space of the existing town, and three urban extensions would provide between 20 - 25,000 homes each.

The proposed design and planning process shows how the town can be expanded to accommodate a larger population with the new homes integrated into the existing infrastructure ‘with minimal impact’.

URBED used Oxford (which had a population of circa 150,000 in the 2011 census) as a case study for the imaginary town and shows how Oxford could rival the strategy adopted by Cambridge for growth and expansion. David argues that there may be as many as 40 cities in England that could be doubled in size in this way, such as York, Norwich, Stafford and Cheltenham. 20 per cent of new homes would be affordable housing.

Speaking to the AJ about the project, David Rudlin director of the URBED Trust said: ‘As part of the exercise we applied the model to Oxford that has already accepted that it needs to build on this scale but hasn’t worked out how to do so. We therefore had some very positive discussions in Oxford with local groups like the Civic Society about the Uxcester model. 

‘As part of the exercise we applied the model to Oxford that has already accepted that it needs to build on this scale but hasn’t worked out how to do so. We therefore had some very positive discussions in Oxford with local groups like the Civic Society about the Uxcester model.’

 

 

 

 

 

 

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