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the wright stuff

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With its first commission for a private residence, MacCormac Jamieson Prichard has drawn inspiration from Frank Lloyd Wright's suburban houses to create a contemporary north London house within a leafy secluded setting

A sloping lawn leading down to the front elevation means that the house is barely visible from the road. The building is conceived as a series of planted terraces captured between pairs of masonry walls, and topped off with a 'floating' roof.

The house looks out onto greenery.

While the upper floors look onto terraces, the lowest level looks out onto trees and a rolling lawn. The trees screen the house from the road.

Woodhams Landscape selected the topiary and landscaped both front and rear gardens. Identical bushes are placed either side of the glazed wall to create a mirror effect.

While the front elevation has three storeys, the rear has only two. This gives the living quarters a direct relationship with the back garden which is more domestic than the grand front lawn The winter garden is the main entrance and the core of the house, giving access to the east and west wings either side.

The suspended staircase is reminiscent of the stair at Wright's Fallingwater.

Living rooms and bedrooms each have a bay window conceived as a timber-framed box, and doors onto a generous terrace.

A horizontal strip of Japanese screens between the living room and winter garden can either be closed for privacy or opened to create a direct link between the living quarters and the main atrium space.

An iroko bridge links the two wings. It also overlooks the winter garden, emphasising the contrast between the grand scale of the central space and the more domestic scale of the upper floors.

Finishes and lighting in the pool area bring light and animation into this semibasement space.

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