Unsupported browser

For a better experience please update your browser to its latest version.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

In addition to the spectacular glass bridge, a curving inclined arch made entirely out of glass with no mechanical connections

  • Comment

In addition to the spectacular glass bridge, a curving inclined arch made entirely out of glass with no mechanical connections, aha has done several other notable footbridges. Working with Future Systems at West India Quay in London's Docklands, it didn't want to do another mast and cable. At Jan Kaplicky's suggestion it devised a floating pontoon partly because it couldn't take load on to either quayside. It goes on to the water instead, with 'one very clever bit', says Hunt. Naturally it would rise and fall slightly as people walk across it; to prevent a seasickness-inducing sensation, the bridge is stressed down on to anchor piles - in effect pre-stressing it against the water. Live loads just reduce this pre-stressing, but not enough to deflect the pontoons.

Lime Kiln Dock, also in the Docklands, was designed without an architect - aha did all the detailing down to the handrails. The dock had to open to allow boats to pass, and again aha eschewed an obvious solution such a bascule, or Dutch cantilever, thinking it would be better to swing it from one side. What emerged was an elegant S-shape, in theory perfectly balanced, but, as Hunt says, 'the design development meant getting the detail right'.

  • Comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions.

Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.