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'Country house' clause bonanza, as two more win approval

  • 4 Comments

Hudson Architects and ADAM Architecture have both used the ‘country house’ clause to win planning for major new rural homes  

Last week the AJ reported that London-based Burrell Mistry had also successfully relied on NPPF paragraph 55 of the planning legislation to bag permission for a 1,263m² home in Surrey’s green belt (AJ 30.04.15).

Despite the recent run of approvals, the paragraph is a rarely used planning law exemption allowing - ‘in special circumstances’ - new-build homes in the countryside.

Hudson Architects worked with University of Bath on its proposed £1.2million, 350m² ‘bio-based’ PassivHaus in Burcott, near Wells, Somerset which will sit on an ‘elevated, sloping site’ in an area of outstanding natural beauty.

According to the practice, the scheme was granted planning consent ‘without difficulty and with the enthusiastic support of local planning officers’ who suggested it “create a noteworthy addition to the district’s and wider still, architectural standards”’.

The home’s most prominent feature is a central ‘basilica’ - inspired by the nearby Dutch barns - which will house the main living spaces.

Anthony Hudson, director at Hudson Architects, said: [This is] is a fascinating project in so many ways - from addressing a beautiful yet sensitive site, to working with the University of Bath on pioneering sustainable construction techniques. I hope it will play its park in raising the standards of rural architecture in the UK, and inform sustainable construction more generally.’

Meanwhile Robert Adam’s practice ADAM Architecture bagged approval from Kings Lynn council for a 9-bedroom classical country house on farmland at Docking, Norfolk.

The architects with specialists to develop a strategy for the ‘innovative use of hydrogen fuel cell technology’ to provide power for the house. 

David Myres of ADAM Architecture said: ‘[This new house] is one of a number of paragraph 55 approvals that the practice has secured.

‘[The decision] demonstrates and reinforces the important marriage between traditional architecture and the latest technologies within the context of the paragraph 55 legislation, and begins to get away from the often ambiguous word ‘contemporary’ contained within previous exceptions clauses.’

  • 4 Comments

Readers' comments (4)

  • WOW a high spec 1,263m² home proposed £1.2million
    These will be the most popular contractors of all time

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  • What century are we lining in? Money can't buy taste! I am talking about ADAM Architecture's Docking Lodge. Sorry, but If you do classical architecture at lease please use classical proportions/golden section. You can mock it, but why can't you do it properly, if do it at all.

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  • well I'm sorry, but Architects are hardly ever the people to design houses for the poor, presuming that's what you would all prefer. Generally speaking they don't have enough experience of it, and at last we see a scheme for those who can afford them.

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  • What century are we lining in? Money can't buy taste! I am talking about ADAM Architecture's Docking Lodge. Sorry, but If you do classical architecture at lease please use classical proportions/golden section. You can mock it, but why can't you do it properly, if do it at all.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

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