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A zinc-clad rooflight/pavilion

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Residential development, Shepherdess Walk Buschow Henley

The original warehouse, now converted into loft apartments, was built at the turn of the century. It has brick walls with intermediate steel columns and flitch-beams, some of which have been replaced with concrete.

Large rooflights have been installed in the top floor apartments to bring more natural light into the centre of the deep (19 - 22m) interiors. They are designed to be fitted with a staircase and mezzanine to give access to a private rooftop terrace.

The rooflights form a landscape of small pavilions on the roof. A 6.9 x 3m rooflight serves a single apartment; a 13 x 9m rooflight, shown on the right, is shared between two, divided by a block-work party wall.

The larger rooflights have double-pitched roofs which slope down to a central gutter. The west pitch of each roof has double-glazed units in a glazing bar/mullion system; the east pitch is clad with zinc. The walls are also clad with zinc on three sides with a glazed galvanised steel screen of doors and windows on the fourth, west side. Rectangular windows in the east wall give views of the East End.

The structure is formed of three portal frames made up of 100mm SHS posts and 203 x 89mm top members. Two of the portals run along the sides of the gutter and are joined together; the third runs above the glazed screen. The east wall is a self-supporting timber frame braced with plywood sheets.

The zinc cladding has vertical standing seams, the sharp joint detail expressing the thin nature of the material. The zinc is fixed to a base of treated timber boarding screwed to battens fixed to a timber frame. To avoid condensation, cladding is ventilated at upper level.

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