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First look

Terrace house-type reinterpreted by Child Graddon Lewis in south-west London

  • 4 Comments

Nine family-sized houses remake the street on the Old Imperial Laundry site in Battersea

The Warriner Gardens scheme by Child Graddon Lewis (CGL) for Marsa Holdings in Battersea is designed as a contemporary take on the traditional terraced house.

Adjacent to the Battersea Park Conservation Area, it is part of a wider site consisting of single-, two- and three-storey buildings known as the Old Imperial Laundry, a series of brick buildings formerly used as an industrial laundry during the 19th century.

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Source: Alan Williams

The scheme’s actual site was previously occupied by dilapidated single-storey ancillary buildings. The new terrace takes its cue in terms of scale, rhythm and materiality from surrounding terraced Victorian housing, while reinterpreting architectural features such as bay windows, with vertical feature bays to the front and rear. 

Built to Code for Sustainable Homes Level 4 and Lifetime Homes standards, the houses have been built over five floors.

At ground floor level, the entrance hall includes a large WC, cloaks cupboard and space for a writing desk in the bay window. From here, the living space is accessed via tall double doors and overlooks the south-facing rear garden and lower ground courtyard.

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Source: Alan Williams

The lower ground floor, has an open-plan kitchen and dining area, connected directly with the living room via a staircase, and opening up onto the courtyard. There is also a large utility room and a media/TV room accessed down a glazed corridor.

An external stair leads back up to the ground floor and the south-facing decked rear garden, from which bike and car parking is accessed.

The main bedroom is located at first floor level, with two further bedrooms on the second floor and a fourth bedroom-cum-study on the third, opening onto a large south-facing terrace.

As part of the development, a series of Victorian terracotta plaques depicting laundry scenes have been salvaged and retained from the former buildings on the site and relocated within the brick front-garden walls. 

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Source: Alan Williams

Architect’s view

The redevelopment of the site presented a rare opportunity to provide a series of new family homes and enhance the quality of the local area by completing the void in the terrace created by the ad hoc series of single-storey industrial buildings. This had disrupted the regular residential rhythm found in the area, adversely affecting the outlook of the facing properties and undermining the sense of neighbourhood in this specific portion of Warriner Gardens.

Taking a cue from the surrounding Victorian terraced housing, the design has been formulated to acknowledge and respect the established scale, rhythm and materiality of the neighbouring housing along Warriner Gardens.

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Source: Alan Williams

By re-imagining key architectural features such as bay windows and the use of modern, minimal brick and window details, the design of each house references the architectural language of the neighbouring properties and re-interprets this in a sympathetic and contemporary manner. To reinforce this approach, a palette of materials inspired by those present locally is employed, including brickwork, stone finishes, white render and grey standing seam metal roofs.

The houses are articulated with vertical feature bays to the front and rear. At the front, the angled bay windows have been designed to direct views up and down the street, to capture and maximise sunlight, and to relate to the street, whereas at the rear the concept is reversed with solid protruding bays designed to provide privacy to bedrooms, and to reduce solar gain on this south-facing elevation.

Simon Child, founder, Child Graddon Lewis

Project data

Start on site January 2017
Completion June 2019
Gross internal floor area 2,452.5m²
Construction cost £11 million
Architect Child Graddon Lewis
Structural engineer Conisbee
Mechanical and electrical Kehr and Tucker
CDM co-ordinator Child Graddon Lewis
Approved building inspector NHBC
Main contractor J Murphy and Sons
CAD software used Revit
Energy assessor Bailey Garner

Environmental data

Assessment rating Code for Sustainable Homes Level 4
Annual CO2 emissions 2.46 tonnes/year
Annual CO2 emissions per m² 0.0076 tonnes (GEA)
Total energy costs over 3 years £2,037
U-values Walls 0.15W/m²K, Roof 0.14W/m²K, Floor 0.15W/m²K
Air Tightness3.0 m³/h.m²
EPC rating 87 B
EI rating 88 B

  • 4 Comments

Readers' comments (4)

  • Battersea is obviously an expensive place, £1.22 Million per house construction cost, but one does get 272.5 sq M per house, of which about a third is in the basement.
    The marvellous first floor front room, with the amazing bat window and the full height 2nd widow is a bathroom : The Georgians did do better.

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  • Industry Professional

    These houses cost £3M plus Stamp Duty!

    That will get you a Grade 2 Listed country house with over 100 acres in my village!

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  • Congratulations to CGL for creating a terrace of amazing houses on a scale that is complementary to the traditional Victorian street scene.

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  • They are beautiful but for a new build home, they're not built to a particularly sustainable standard which is a shame.

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