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Lancaster Cohousing by Eco Arc

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Three Passivhaus projects: Hattie Hartman on Eco Arc Architects’ Lancaster Cohousing

A variation of conventional masonry cavity wall construction that could accommodate high levels of insulation and a truss rafter roof were selected after cost analysis with the contractor. The required insulation levels have been met with traditional cavity wall construction combined with, I-beam roofs, triple-glazed windows and airtightness provided by wet plaster and the roof vapour control layer.

Simple details for low thermal bridging, such as adding thermal blocks to the inner leaf and taking EPS cavity insulation below the DPC to the bottom of the slab, were used with conventional strip foundations or pile foundations where ground conditions on the sloping site required. A render finish to the masonry walls enabled the introduction of insulated door and wind reveals to further reduce thermal bridging. Simple upgrades to the roof design, such as Gutex thermal board sarking and maintaining continuity of the roof and wall head insulation eliminated bridging at the eaves.

These factors combine to deliver heating demand that can be met with a minimal system. Each home has a single radiator in the living space and a towel rail in the bathroom, with total heat output below 1kW.

Construction

A variation of conventional masonry cavity wall construction that could accommodate high levels of insulation and a truss rafter roof were selected after cost analysis with the contractor. The required insulation levels have been met with traditional cavity wall construction combined with, I-beam roofs, triple-glazed windows and airtightness provided by wet plaster and the roof vapour control layer.

Simple details for low thermal bridging, such as adding thermal blocks to the inner leaf and taking EPS cavity insulation below the DPC to the bottom of the slab, were used with conventional strip foundations or pile foundations where ground conditions on the sloping site required. A render finish to the masonry walls enabled the introduction of insulated door and wind reveals to further reduce thermal bridging. Simple upgrades to the roof design, such as Gutex thermal board sarking and maintaining continuity of the roof and wall head insulation eliminated bridging at the eaves.

These factors combine to deliver heating demand that can be met with a minimal system. Each home has a single radiator in the living space and a towel rail in the bathroom, with total heat output below 1kW.

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