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Architects Journal
Zoë Blackler

  • Amos Partnership and BSA reach £6,500 illegal software settlement

    15-Apr-2004

    news
  • New twist on tower block design

    15-Apr-2004

    Experimental practice Luz Vargas Architects has produced its solution for affordable housing - a tower block design that offers an alternative to the 'scourge' of the low-to-medium-rise blocks currently blighting our cities.
  • PPG 7 revelations spark moratorium demand

    25-Mar-2004

    The government is facing calls for a moratorium on PPG 7 planning inquiries following publication in the AJ of secret instructions to inspectors ruling on new country houses.
  • Zaha Hadid becomes first woman to scoop $100,000 Pritzker Prize

    25-Mar-2004

    news -
  • Public jury 'must decide' on court

    11-Mar-2004

    news
  • Smithsons' archive leaves UK

    11-Mar-2004

    news
  • EU directive's passport to UK practice freedom

    4-Mar-2004

    Architects could soon have unrestricted freedom to practice throughout Europe if the latest EU initiative makes it onto the statute books.
  • Sea is key for Cadell2's Kirkcaldy

    4-Mar-2004

    news
  • CABE chief Rouse resigns to take up Housing Corporation challenge

    26-Feb-2004

    News
  • Isokon returns to former glory

    19-Feb-2004

    After decades of neglect, Wells Coates' Isokon building has a new lease of life, following the completion of an extensive renovation by Avanti Architects.
  • Hodder hits back in Hackney row

    12-Feb-2004

    news
  • School's out over education

    12-Feb-2004

    ajenda
  • Bankside tower turns table on Tate

    5-Feb-2004

    news
  • League tables in pipeline

    5-Feb-2004

    news
  • Competition winner shunned as Newham chooses runner-up

    29-Jan-2004

    Young London practice Piercy Conner was left disappointed this week after being named the winner of a RIBA competition, only to be passed over by the client.
  • Findlay's sea 'slug' plans stalled

    29-Jan-2004

    Ushida Findlay's controversial 'slug' proposal for Hastings seafront has fallen victim to bitter wrangling between the two authorities charged with regenerating the rundown East Sussex town.
  • Future for King's Cross in doubt

    29-Jan-2004

    A government review into the escalating cost of Arup/Allies and Morrison's new ticket hall at London's King's Cross Underground station threatens to destabilise an ambitious regeneration programme for the entire area.
  • Brits show Venetian class

    22-Jan-2004

    Although still in its infancy, the Venice Biennale is recognised as an important launchpad, and a place in the British Pavilion will be a major boost for the nine architects chosen to represent the UK in 2004.
  • Cook to curate Biennale pavilion

    22-Jan-2004

    Nine practices on the verge of international stardom are to represent Britain at the 2004 Venice Architecture Biennale.
  • Leaked report shows PFI failings

    22-Jan-2004

    Newham's new mental health unit has been hailed as a case study in the pitfalls of PFI, after a leaked report into the construction of the project revealed a catalogue of problems.
  • Dutch auction policy 'disgraceful'

    15-Jan-2004

    news
  • Glasgow School of Art seeks funds to launch the Mac mark II

    15-Jan-2004

    The Glasgow School of Art will gain a new 21stcentury icon to match its world-famous Mackintosh Building, if governors can raise the millions needed.
  • Waterside concert hall success in Norway for home practice

    15-Jan-2004

    Stavanger, Norway's fourth-largest city, is set to gain a new international-calibre concert hall, following an open competition. From the Europe-wide entries, Oslo-based practice Medplan Arkitekter won first prize, with Edinburgh-based practice Allan Murray Architects coming in second.
  • Architecture gains two honours

    8-Jan-2004

    The profession has secured just two awards in the Queen's New Year's Honours, bringing to an end the bumper crop of the last few years.
  • Experts uncover secret Mies villa

    8-Jan-2004

    A previously unknown villa by Mies van der Rohe has been discovered in Germany.
  • And that was the year that was

    18-Dec-2003

    From Ground Zero to the Thames Gateway, 2003 saw redevelopment high on the agenda. There were triumphs for Herzog & de Meuron, Jørn Utzon and Renzo Piano.
  • OBE reject hoax sparks Owusu Guardian writ

    18-Dec-2003

    Founder of the Society of Black Architects, Elsie Owusu OBE, is suing the Guardian newspaper after falling victim to a malicious hoax.
  • Northern Ireland plans CABE-style champion

    4-Dec-2003

    Northern Ireland is set to gain its own CABE-style design watchdog, which could be up and running within two years.
  • NPS's Norwich bus station: 'waste of money'

    4-Dec-2003

    CABE has condemned a design by Norfolk County Council's inhouse architects for a new bus station as an 'unacceptable use of public money'.
  • Councils unfit to protect our heritage, claims EH

    27-Nov-2003

    English Heritage has published research into the state of Britain's historic building stock, which rubbishes government proposals to hand responsibility for Grade II listings to local authorities.
  • Cornish Poundbury set to reopen the style debate

    20-Nov-2003

    Plans by the Prince of Wales for another Poundburystyle development in Cornwall could meet with opposition from planners determined to avoid 'Victorian pastiche'.
  • Island paradise to keep Brighton's sun shining

    20-Nov-2003

    Alan Phillips Architects has drawn up proposals for a man-made island off the coast at Brighton where the sun will always shine, whatever the weather.
  • Niall McLaughlin makes mobile waves in Hull

    20-Nov-2003

    A new centre in Hull celebrating the city's built environment is set to open next year in an innovative, mobile building by Niall McLaughlin Architects.
  • Shed KM's 'Lego' plans slammed

    20-Nov-2003

    Birmingham planners have thrown cold water on plans by Shed KM for a radical overhaul of the famous Fort Dunlop warehouse.
  • Architects urged to join campaign to fight Palestinian 'prison' policy

    13-Nov-2003

    Peace campaigner Just Peace UK is appealing to architects to help fight Israeli oppression of Palestinians in the occupied territories.
  • Howarth joins country house fight

    13-Nov-2003

    Labour's former architecture minister Alan Howarth has taken up the cause of the AJ's country house campaign.
  • Arup lets the music play in China

    6-Nov-2003

    A legend of two friends united by their love of music is the inspiration behind Arup Associates' proposal for a new performing arts centre in China.
  • Site 'key' to Holyrood cost farce

    6-Nov-2003

    The key to the escalating cost of the new Scottish parliament lies in the earliest decision to pick the Holyrood site, the investigation into the fiasco heard this week.
  • V&A stalls on final Pirelli selection

    6-Nov-2003

    The Victoria and Albert Museum has delayed a decision on its Pirelli garden competition, sending three of the shortlisted practices back to the drawing board.
  • City warns of conflict of interest in listings review

    30-Oct-2003

    The Corporation of London is urging the government not to hand responsibility for listings to English Heritage.
  • Green Belt rubbished by Rooker

    30-Oct-2003

    Regeneration minister Jeff Rooker has provoked outrage after dismissing most Green Belt land as 'rubbish'.
  • Green light for new country house

    23-Oct-2003

    A Suffolk planning committee last week defied the advice of its own officers to unreservedly approve a new country house by Paul + O Architects.
  • Tower inquiry holds key to cluster of tall buildings

    23-Oct-2003

    Broadway Malyan is gearing up for a public inquiry into its Vauxhall Tower scheme that, if successful, could pave the way for a cluster of skyscrapers being drawn up for the south London site.
  • 'Significant and beautiful' Laban lands Stirling Prize

    16-Oct-2003

    The wow factor won the day at the 2003 Stirling Prize when Herzog & de Meuron's Laban centre danced away with architecture's top honour.
  • Stirling stars win East End housing

    16-Oct-2003

    Stirling Prize winner Herzog & de Meuron is set to repeat its magic in London's East End with an exemplar of affordable housing.
  • Classicists mount fight in Brum

    9-Oct-2003

    Birmingham's Civic Society has launched an offensive to block the use of Modernist architecture on a key site in the city centre.
  • Scotland set to create CABE-style watchdog

    9-Oct-2003

    Scotland is to have its own CABE-style design champion to replace the 'outdated' Royal Fine Art Commission for Scotland (RFACfS).
  • Ferguson craves clarity

    2-Oct-2003

    George Ferguson will call on the government to produce a definition of the much-used term 'sustainability' when he speaks at the Labour Party Conference today.
  • And so to ZED Dunster holds key to housing crisis

    25-Sep-2003

    Bill Dunster Architects is set to reveal its solution to the current housing crisis. To help achieve the largescale house building envisaged by John Prescott's sustainable communities plan, it has adapted the principles of its Stirling Prize-shortlisted BedZED development to ZEDinaBox - a range of standard housing types for use by the volume housebuilders.
  • Architecture with a humanitarian conscience

    25-Sep-2003

    enda
  • Battersea on world danger list

    25-Sep-2003

    The World Monuments Fund (WMF) has included Battersea Power Station on its list of 100 most endangered sites in a bid to speed up renovation of the building.
  • Towers at risk from Shanghai ban

    25-Sep-2003

    Thousands of skyscraper proposals, including KPF's plans for the world's tallest tower (pictured), are hanging in the balance following moves by officials in Shanghai to halt tall buildings in the city.
  • Invisible house pleads special case

    11-Sep-2003

    Marks Barfield's scheme for an 'invisible house' on Green Belt land in London's Mill Hill has been rejected on principle by planners, despite winning over the support of CABE and English Heritage.
  • Johansen's appliance of science

    11-Sep-2003

    American architect John M Johansen, whose futuristic work takes its inspiration from cutting-edge science, is in the country for the UK launch of his book, Nanoarchitecture: A new species of architecture. Johansen, who will be presenting some of his recent projects at the Building Centre in London's Store Street tonight (Thursday), was taught by Gropius, employed by SOM and Breuer, and won the admiration of Reyner Banham and Archigram.
  • 'Niemeyer's pavilion must remain'

    11-Sep-2003

    The Serpentine Gallery's temporary pavilion, now a regular summer fixture, could also become a permanent fixture, if architect Stephen Fry achieves his dream.
  • Planning reforms set to hit housing ambitions

    11-Sep-2003

    The mammoth house building programme planned for the South East could be held up by new planning reforms that came into effect last week, the House Builders Federation has warned.
  • Victory for Twentieth Century Society as Erskine's Byker is listed

    4-Sep-2003

    Ralph Erskine's Byker Estate looks set to win listed status and protection against piecemeal demolition.
  • Allies and Morrison in dock chop

    28-Aug-2003

    Allies and Morrison has become the latest signature practice to lose a major job to a littleknown rival after securing planning permission.
  • Heatwave prompts 'green' drive

    28-Aug-2003

    The industry's leading thinkers on sustainability have made an urgent plea for drastic action to green the nation's building stock and combat global warming. The calls come in the wake of the recent heatwave that saw temperatures soar to more than 100degreesF.
  • Bradford democracy design delay

    31-Jul-2003

    Bauman Lyons Architects' winning scheme in a high-profile competition to revitalise local democracy through design (right) has failed to get off the drawing board, more than six months down the line.
  • Foster's City Hall attacked over its High-Tech 'failure'

    31-Jul-2003

    High-Tech, with its preference for monochrome glass and steel, is inherently at odds with the needs of the visually impaired, a study has found.
  • Libeskind breaks silence to voice fury over WTC 'misconceptions'

    24-Jul-2003

    Nina Libeskind has hit back at claims that her husband has been sidelined on the project to rebuild on the World Trade Center site.
  • Listing bid to foil Renault threat

    24-Jul-2003

    The Twentieth Century Society is calling for the spot listing of Norman Foster's Renault building in Swindon after learning of plans to pull it down. The Modern architecture champion is appealing to culture secretary Tessa Jowell to grant the seminal building Grade II* status after receiving an anonymous tip that it is threatened with demolition.
  • Open house for Squire in Kenya

    24-Jul-2003

    Squire and Partners has managed to break the 'compound culture' with its new centre for the British Council in Kenya, despite the increased threat of terrorist attacks on British citizens abroad.
  • EH to gain more power in radical listings overhaul

    17-Jul-2003

    A review of the listing system, to be revealed by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) today, will include proposals for a radical overhaul in the protection of historic buildings.
  • Tate moves to ease local fears over extension plans for St Ives gallery

    17-Jul-2003

    The Tate was issuing assurances this week that it would not pursue plans to extend its gallery in St Ives against the will of the town's residents.
  • Evans & Shalev and ORMS go west

    10-Jul-2003

    The recent revival of home-grown tourism has helped resuscitate a 14-year-old project for a new holiday village in Cornwall. The Beach in Carlyon Bay, masterplanned by Evans & Shalev, looks set to give a further boost to the area around St Austell, which already benefits from the success of the Eden Project.
  • Impasse over Assembly access

    10-Jul-2003

    Disability rights campaigners have attacked the Richard Rogers Partnership's Welsh Assembly building for failing to champion disabled access. Advisers to the project team on access issues are considering walking out of discussions in protest at the lack of progress.
  • PRP to set the standard for housing with model new town near York

    10-Jul-2003

    One hundred years after the Joseph Rowntree Foundation created the garden-city village of New Earswick, it is seeking permission for a new model-town extension near York.
  • No place like home in design awards

    3-Jul-2003

    Schemes for private housebuilders have dominated this year's Housing Design Awards, accounting for 11 of the14 winners.
  • Owzat! Fears for quality as Miller stumps HOK to take on Oval stand

    3-Jul-2003

    HOK has lost its project for a new stand at the Oval cricket ground in London to the Miller Partnership, reigniting fears of 'dumbing down'.
  • Peace inspires Gustafson Porter Beirut scheme

    3-Jul-2003

    A new landscaped garden by Gustafson Porter, dedicated to forgiveness, is key to the reconstruction of the war-ravaged city of Beirut.
  • RCA go-ahead 'a tragedy' for site

    3-Jul-2003

    Grimshaw has got the go-ahead for its 'ellipse' building for the Royal College of Art, despite impassioned protests from Docomomo and the Twentieth Century Society.
  • Bridging the gap in east London

    26-Jun-2003

    The six leading architects shortlisted to design a landmark bridge for London's Thames Gateway have revealed their proposals in an anonymous exhibition.
  • Reshuffle renews fears of lack of focus for contruction and design

    26-Jun-2003

    Full details of Tony Blair's newlook government have now been finalised in a reshuffle of MPs that continues to carve up responsibility for architecture and the built environment.
  • Euro drive extends planning reform

    12-Jun-2003

    More changes to the planning system are on the way in the next few months to help prepare the country for entry into the euro, chancellor Gordon Brown has announced.
  • 'Lack of iconic buildings' damaged Birmingham's city of culture bid

    12-Jun-2003

    The chair of the judges for the Capital of Culture 2008 has blamed Birmingham's failed bid on its lack of exciting architecture, prompting a hostile reaction from those leading the city's regeneration.
  • MSPs demand refund of rising parliament costs

    12-Jun-2003

    Members of the Scottish Parliament are demanding financial compensation for the rising costs of their new parliament building.
  • CABE and EH square up over towers

    5-Jun-2003

    CABE and English Heritage are set for another high-profile confrontation over Ian Ritchie Architects' controversial plans for Potters' Fields in London's Southwark.
  • Campaigner encouraged by progress on racism

    5-Jun-2003

    Doreen Lawrence, mother of the murdered black schoolboy and aspiring architect Stephen, said this week that the profession was beginning to tackle its inherent racism.
  • Country houses boost economy

    5-Jun-2003

    New country houses built through PPG 7 have made a positive economic contribution to the countryside, researchers from the University of Reading have concluded.
  • Prescott denies phasing out new country houses by the back door

    29-May-2003

    The government has denied that the country house clause in PPG 7 is already being phased out ahead of public consultation.
  • AJ launches bid to save 'country house' clause

    22-May-2003

    The government's plans to scrap the country house clause in PPG 7 have been greeted with condemnation from the profession.
  • Clerkenwell plans first biennale

    22-May-2003

    In the Middle Ages, monks held annual mystery plays there. Before the industrial revolution it gained popularity as a health resort; later, it became a centre for printing and clock and watchmaking.
  • Olympics demand fresh approach

    22-May-2003

    A successful London Olympics bid could lead to a wholesale rethink of the government's procurement methods, regeneration expert Fred Manson predicted this week.
  • RIAS makes the connection

    15-May-2003

    A host of top speakers at last week's annual Scottish architecture convention in Stirling looked at various connections, including the relationships between past and present, natural and artificial, and linking infrastructure to the city. Zoë Blackler reports
  • RIBA and CABE fighting threat to 'inspired' country house guidance

    15-May-2003

    CABE and the RIBA are set to put pressure on the government to abandon its plans to revise Planning Policy Guidance Note 7 (PPG 7).
  • Ferguson recruits starchitects to fly the flag for the profession

    8-May-2003

    RIBA president-elect George Ferguson (pictured) has lined up a kitchen cabinet of hard-hitting special advisers to become spokesmen for the profession.
  • Government to slam door on great country houses

    8-May-2003

    The government is set to close a planning loophole that has triggered the recent surge in new country houses. A revision of PPG7 will delete a key paragraph that allows for a large house to be built on open countryside where the architecture is of 'outstanding' quality.
  • Will Poulton Gorse be the last of the PPG 7s?

    8-May-2003

    Stanton Williams Architects'scheme for Poulton Gorse House in Gloucestershire is the latest modern country house to win planning approval. With the government in the process of reviewing its countryside guidance, it could also be the last of the PPG 7 houses.
  • Big guns lose out to local practice for Soil Association HQ project

    1-May-2003

    The Soil Association has shunned several of the country's leading practices in favour of a relative unknown to design its new headquarters.
  • Modern ruin proposal for derelict Cardross

    1-May-2003

    Gillespie Kidd & Coia's best-known work, St Peter's College in Cardross, Scotland, is in such a state of dereliction that it could be made a rare modern ruin.
  • RIBA wants slice of housing action

    1-May-2003

    The RIBA is pushing for a new role in the delivery of the government's massive house-building plans, which came under heavy criticism this week.
  • Grimshaw's Bath Spa hit by delays

    24-Apr-2003

    Grimshaw's eagerly awaited Bath Spa scheme has run into costly delays, sparking recriminations between the design team and contractor.
  • International call to design September 11 memorial

    24-Apr-2003

    The competition to design the memorial to the victims of September 11 - which will form the centrepiece of Daniel Libeskind's design for Ground Zero - will begin next week.
  • Public deceived about the costs of mega-projects

    24-Apr-2003

    Most major building projects only get the goahead because their promoters lie about their true cost, according to a controversial new study.
  • Krier lands anti-Pritzker for promotion of Classicism

    17-Apr-2003

    Leon Krier, architect to the Prince of Wales, has won the first $100,000 (£64,000) Richard H Driehaus Prize, Classical architecture's answer to the Pritzker.
  • RIBA wary of EC praise for 'unregulated' UK profession

    17-Apr-2003

    The RIBA has dismissed a report from the European Commission that applauds Britain for having one of the least regulated architecture professions in Europe.
  • Lottery boost for UCL's 'window on the world'

    10-Apr-2003

    Jeremy Dixon.Edward Jones' latest gallery project, the Petrie Museum at University College London (UCL), has secured £4.9 million in Heritage Lottery funding.
  • Opponents take sides for London tower fight

    10-Apr-2003

    The public inquiry into Renzo Piano's London Bridge Tower begins on 15 April and runs for four weeks. Here Zoë Blackler considers both sides of the argument
  • Woods Bagot faces battle over Yorkshire airport plans

    10-Apr-2003

    Government support for plans by Australian practice Woods Bagot for a new passenger airport in South Yorkshire have sparked a storm of protest from environmental campaigners.
  • Libeskind unveils four-year target for Ground Zero

    3-Apr-2003

    The centrepiece skyscraper in Daniel Libeskind's design for New York's Ground Zero will be completed within the next four years, the architect said this week.
  • Protest forces redesign for Findlay's Hastings 'slug'

    27-Mar-2003

    Ushida Findlay has gone back to the drawing board with its radical design (pictured) for the rundown East Sussex seaside town of Hastings.
  • Architect struck off for five counts of incompetence

    20-Mar-2003

    A Leeds-based architect has been struck off after he failed to produce even the basic information needed to erect a domestic extension.
  • frank talking

    20-Mar-2003

    people
  • Negligence claim leaves PKS facing threat of bankruptcy

    20-Mar-2003

    Paskin Kyriakides Sands (PKS) is facing possible bankruptcy after losing a legal case that leaves it with a huge liability shortfall, potentially as much as £21 million.
  • Edinburgh group challenges post-fire regeneration plans

    13-Mar-2003

    Organisers of an unofficial competition to produce proposals for the fire-wrecked Cowgate site in Edinburgh have named their winning schemes - even though Malcolm Fraser has already clinched the job.
  • Superstars battle it out for a place by the sea

    13-Mar-2003

    Three teams of world-class architects have revealed their proposals for a prime site on the seafront at Hove in Sussex, writes Zoë Blackler.
  • ARB faces test case over validation

    6-Mar-2003

    The ARB is facing a legal test of its powers, after withdrawing prescription for De Montfort University against the advice of its own visiting board.
  • Adopt a drawing plan aims to fund Architecture for All

    27-Feb-2003

    The RIBA is encouraging people to adopt a drawing from its celebrated collection in a bid to raise funding for the Architecture for All project Sponsors will be able to choose one of 150 pieces in the collection, which includes works by Palladio, Le Corbusier and Voysey.
  • Design excellence adds another chapter

    27-Feb-2003

    Talent present and future was rewarded and encouraged with the ninth American Institute of Architecture Excellence in Design Awards announced last week A hotel in Prague, an office scheme in central London, a visitor centre and a theatre production centre have been named the best completed projects of the past year by the American Institute of Architects' London chapter.
  • Alsop to be on his best behaviour in Valencia

    20-Feb-2003

    Will Alsop's contribution to this year's Bienal de Valencia is a project entitled 'The Department Store of Proper Behaviour', in collaboration with the artist Bruce McLean.
  • Twentieth Century Society to fight Grimshaw's RCA plan

    20-Feb-2003

    The Twentieth Century Society pledged this week to fight Grimshaw's plans for a new building for the Royal College of Art (RCA) in London.
  • Bartlett academics slam research panel 'scandal'

    13-Feb-2003

    Leading academics from the Bartlett school have condemned the assessment panel responsible for the recent drop in its research rating and accused its chairman of bias.
  • Moneo wins RIBA Royal Gold Medal

    13-Feb-2003

    The RIBA has named Rafael Moneo winner of the 2003 Royal Gold Medal, awarded for lifetime achievement. The Spaniard will receive the honour at an awards ceremony later this year, subject to the decision being approved this week by the RIBA's ruling council.
  • Wilkinson Eyre's 'jewel' on Swansea waterfront

    13-Feb-2003

    The start on site of Wilkinson Eyre's new museum in Swansea was officially celebrated this week with a visit from Wales' first minister, Rhodri Morgan. The National Waterfront Museum Swansea is one of the first museums to be designed since the abolition of admission charges, and the scheme reflects this change.
  • Chipperfield reveals £14m Des Moines plans

    6-Feb-2003

    David Chipperfield Architects has completed its design for a new public library for the US city of Des Moines in Iowa.
  • Expert witness in Koolhaas case battles to save career

    6-Feb-2003

    The discredited expert witness at the centre of a failed plagiarism claim against Rem Koolhaas has this week been fighting to save his reputation.
  • hailing siza

    6-Feb-2003

    people
  • Rogers at Welsh Assembly again as rivals shun project

    6-Feb-2003

    Richard Rogers Partnership has won back its Welsh Assembly job (above), but only after the other teams in the running pulled out, the AJ has learnt.
  • Stephen Lawrence Trust awards its first bursary

    6-Feb-2003

    The Stephen Lawrence Trust has awarded its first bursary, to an East London University student.
  • British 'failures' go down Europan

    30-Jan-2003

    Britain has withdrawn from this year's Europan competition as a result of its abysmal track record in seeing winning schemes through to development. The UK has failed to put forward sites for the biennial pan-European design competition, overseen by CABE and the RIBA, which offers a unique opportunity for younger practices to plan large and complex sites.
  • RIBA 'prime candidate' to land Sir Leslie Martin archive

    30-Jan-2003

    The RIBA is set to acquire the late Sir Leslie Martin's architectural archive, after it was secured by the government. The DCMS has accepted the valuable collection from Martin's family in place of £245,000 in inheritance tax. The culture secretary is now considering a request from Martin's widow that it be put in trust to the RIBA.
  • ARB strikes off Bath architect for 'history of lies'

    23-Jan-2003

    A Bath-based architect has been struck off the ARB register after being found guilty of serious professional misconduct. Brett Greatorex was found guilty of all seven charges against him by the ARB's professional conduct committee last Wednesday.
  • Big guns challenge the warmongers

    23-Jan-2003

    The profession's leading lights have joined forces to condemn a possible war against Iraq. Charles Jencks and RIBA president Paul Hyett are spearheading a campaign of 'Architects Against the War'.
  • Downing Street boost for new Maggie's Centres

    23-Jan-2003

    Chancellor Gordon Brown and his wife Sarah this week hosted an event at 11 Downing Street to help raise funds for the Maggie's Cancer Caring Centres' ambitious building programme.
  • First Welsh design chief makes training a priority

    16-Jan-2003

    The new Design Commission for Wales has appointed its first director, Carole-Anne Davies.
  • Bennetts among the honours in Queen's new year list

    9-Jan-2003

    Two architects picked up honours in the Queen's New Year's list, but there were no knighthoods for the profession this time around.
  • EH backtracks on Minerva Tower

    9-Jan-2003

    English Heritage has withdrawn its opposition to Grimshaw's £350 million Minerva Tower planned for London's St Botolph's Street. The heritage body has reversed its position on the 43-storey tower, after previously pledging to oppose it (AJ 28.11.02).
  • Local's legal challenge holds up MJP's BBC flagship

    9-Jan-2003

    MacCormac Jamieson Prichard's plans to revamp the BBC's central London headquarters have been held up by a legal challenge from a powerful local landowner.
  • Docomomo joins fight to save 'significant' Greenspan

    14-Nov-2002

    The campaign to save Connell, Ward and Lucas' Grade II-listed Greenspan at Virginia Water in Surrey has stepped up, with Docomomo UK pitching in to help fight the planned demolition.
  • BDP grows with acquisition of Whicheloe Macfarlane

    7-Nov-2002

    The UK's largest architecture practice, Building Design Partnership (BDP), is set to grow even larger following a merger agreement with Whicheloe Macfarlane MDP.
  • Dixon Jones opening doors at National Gallery

    7-Nov-2002

    Jeremy Dixon.Edward Jones has unveiled plans to revamp the National Gallery's East Wing.
  • Keith Williams adds to Athlone's civic stock

    7-Nov-2002

    Keith Williams Architects has begun construction of its Civic Centre, Athlone, in Ireland's County Westmeath.The scheme, the latest in a series of high-profile civic projects, responds to a wider drive by the Irish government to modernise local democracy.
  • Westminster to reject 'bulky' Robert Adam Piccadilly offices

    31-Oct-2002

    Westminster council is set to refuse permission for a Robert Adam Architects-designed scheme beside the former Simpsons department store on Piccadilly.Officers have concluded that the quality of the grand Classical office-led scheme does not justify demolition of the three buildings that currently occupy the site. They are urging councillors, who will consider the proposals at a committee meeting tonight, to demand a reworking of the plans.
  • CABE attacks plan to demolish Kidderminster Piano building

    24-Oct-2002

    CABE has condemned Lyons + Sleeman + Hoare's plan to demolish Kidderminster's much-loved Piano building and replace it with a new cinema designed by the practice.
  • Mayor's Thames Gateway plans at risk from flood threat

    24-Oct-2002

    The large-scale development planned for the Thames Gateway is at risk of flooding unless immediate action is taken to protect it.
  • Chipperfield slams 'secretive' Stirling Prize judging

    17-Oct-2002

    David Chipperfield has called for a review of the voting system for the Stirling Prize and an end to the use of a secret ballot.
  • Second Stirling triumph for Wilkinson Eyre

    17-Oct-2002

    Wilkinson Eyre has scooped the 2002 Stirling Prize with its 'blinking' Gateshead Millennium Bridge - the second time the practice has landed the prize.
  • Spitalfields campaign to fight on as scheme gets go-ahead

    17-Oct-2002

    Campaigners against Foster and Partners' plans for London's Spitalfields Market have pledged to take their fight to central government after the scheme won planning approval last week.
  • Brindleyplace team in £1bn King's Cross vision

    10-Oct-2002

    The team behind the highly praised Brindleyplace in Birmingham has reformed to produce a billion-pound-plus,20-year plan for the development of London's King's Cross. Allies and Morrison and Porphyrios Associates have jointly produced this vision for 23.8ha of blighted land north of King's Cross and St Pancras stations.
  • Four top teams vie to design £12m Poole Harbour bridge

    10-Oct-2002

    Four teams of leading architects are vying for the chance to design a new bridge across Poole Harbour. Ian Ritchie Architects and Schlaich Bergermann, McDowell + Benedetti with Arup, Wilkinson Eyre Architects with engineer Gifford and Dutch practice Posford Haskoning are on the shortlist for the £12 million project following an international call for entries.
  • Northern Architecture head loses job after centre windfall

    10-Oct-2002

    The driving force behind the North's architecture centre has been made redundant - following a pledge from CABE to significantly increase the organisation's funding.
  • Malcolm Fraser scoops £25,000 top Scots honour

    3-Oct-2002

    Dance Base by Malcolm Fraser Architects has been named the best new building in Scotland. The £5 million dance studio in Edinburgh beat four other shortlisted schemes to win the RIAS's inaugural £25,000 Award for Architecture.
  • New director steps up 20th Century Society campaigns

    3-Oct-2002

    The Twentieth Century Society is launching a series of new campaigns following the arrival of director Catherine Croft.
  • RICS set to press Labour on housebuilding programme

    26-Sep-2002

    The RICS will be pressing ministers for more details of the government's housebuilding programme at a seminar at the Labour Party Conference in Blackpool next week.
  • Scottish five to fight it out for £25,000 RIAS accolade

    26-Sep-2002

    Five buildings are in the running for the title of best building in Scotland. The winner of the RIAS award for architecture, to be announced on Friday, will walk away with £25,000 - the largest sum for any UK architecture prize.
  • Foster completes full set with 'Nobel for the arts' prize win

    19-Sep-2002

    Lord Foster (left) has scooped the last major honour left for him to collect - the Praemium Imperiale.
  • Gensler's Westminster rethink wins over critics

    19-Sep-2002

    Gensler has convinced its critics with this revised scheme for a prominent London site. One Westminster Bridge, a speculative office scheme for Frogmore Developments, earned notoriety after London mayor Ken Livingstone exercised his power of refusal for the first time to block the plans.
  • The sky's the limit for Zaha Hadid in Austria

    19-Sep-2002

    Zaha Hadid's £3 million ski jump on the Bergisel Mountain, overlooking the Austrian city of Innsbruck, opens this week in time for the next ski season.
  • Council's renovation plans threaten exemplary estate

    5-Sep-2002

    One of the best examples of post-war housing, the Brandon Estate in Kennington, south London, is to lose its 'unique character' as the result of insensitive renovations planned by the local council.
  • London 'must take lead on sustainable development'

    5-Sep-2002

    London deputy mayor Nicky Gavron has called for cities to take the lead in sustainable development. Addressing the Global Alliance for Building Sustainability (GABS) in Johannesburg last week, she said cities such as London must set an example.
  • Tall buildings 'are not the answer'

    5-Sep-2002

    A parliamentary select committee has criticised tall buildings, claiming they are not essential to either an urban renaissance or to meet the capital's development needs.
  • Gehry on song with LA orchestral manoeuvres

    29-Aug-2002

    Frank Gehry's US$274 million (£180 million) Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles is entering the final stage of construction.
  • Global Alliance for sustainable building

    29-Aug-2002

    With world leaders gathered in Johannesburg for the Earth Summit, construction industry heads are holding their own conference on sustainability. Zoë Blackler reports
  • RIBA gets tough on sustainability

    29-Aug-2002

    The profession must rise to the challenge of climate change and alter its building practices to meet the needs of the future or face charges of liability in years to come, the RIBA has warned. The call to arms comes as industry leaders meet in Johannesburg to contribute to the Earth Summit discussions.
  • DCM wins over jury for Manchester law centre

    15-Aug-2002

    Denton Corker Marshall has won the prestigious competition to design Manchester's new £50 million-plus Civil Justice Centre (above).The Australian practice beat off competition from Richard Rogers Partnership and Pringle Richards Sharratt (pictured opposite) in the final stages of a process being hailed as a new model for Public Private Partnerships (AJ 8.11.01). In the first arrangement of its kind, the Lord Chancellor's Department chose the three shortlisted practices independently ...
  • Legal battle over Prescott ruling

    15-Aug-2002

    The developer behind Foster and Partners' £100 million London City Racecourse (pictured) is gearing up for legal action against the government, after losing a public inquiry into the scheme.
  • Manchester's lap of honour

    15-Aug-2002

    Following the success of the Commonwealth Games, Manchester hosted an international conference on international sporting events and the buildings in which they take place. Paul Finch and Zoë Blackler report
  • Scots seek homeless solution to replace dangerous hostels

    15-Aug-2002

    Glasgow's architecture centre, the Lighthouse, is hosting a workshop this week to explore alternatives to the notorious hostel buildings for the homeless.
  • Luder unveils new vision for ARB and the architect's role

    1-Aug-2002

    New chairman of the ARB Owen Luder has set out his vision for how the regulatory body will develop, including a fundamental review of the profession and of the role of the architect.
  • Future Systems' designs in a class of their own

    25-Jul-2002

    Future Systems has produced these prototype designs for the classrooms of the future. The 'World Classrooms'will be constructed in three schools in London's Richmond - Meadlands primary school, Grey Court secondary school and Strathmore special needs school.
  • Heron 'paves way' for tall buildings

    25-Jul-2002

    The Corporation of London has hailed this week's victory for Kohn Pedersen Fox's 222m Heron Tower as a triumph for tall buildings. Deputy prime minister John Prescott ruled on Monday in favour of the controversial skyscraper planned for Bishopsgate in the City of London. His decision follows a costly legal battle fought out at a public inquiry last autumn.
  • Buschow Henley homes in on radical rethink for prisons

    18-Jul-2002

    Buschow Henley Architects has produced this architectural vision for the prison of the 21st century.
  • Israelis in Berlin censorship row

    18-Jul-2002

    The association representing architects in Israel is facing accusations of censorship after it blocked a controversial exhibition planned for the International Union of Architects' (UIA) World Congress of Architecture in Berlin next week. The Israel Association of United Architects (IAUA) has refused to allow two of its members to display the exhibition - on the politics of Israeli planning policy - claiming it is damaging to the Israeli state.
  • Ushida Findlay flies flag for Hastings with UK first

    18-Jul-2002

    Ushida Findlay's £3 million project for a new visitor centre and mixed-use development on the seafront at Hastings is the flagship project in the £400 million regeneration of the area.
  • Bennetts challenges KSS's designs for Brighton pier

    11-Jul-2002

    Bennetts Associates is spearheading a campaign to halt KSS Sport and Leisure Design's proposed £34 million revamp of Brighton's historic West Pier.
  • CIC reveals new design 'language'

    11-Jul-2002

    The Construction Industry Council has revealed its Design Quality Indicators - a measurement system to assess good design - hailing it a new 'language' for the construction industry to talk about design.
  • Landmark 1950s education buildings facing demolition

    11-Jul-2002

    A group of landmark educational buildings from the 1950s are under threat of demolition. The former St Albans College of Further Education, produced by the Hertfordshire County Architects Department during its heyday, could be torn down to make way for a residential scheme.
  • BCIA shortlist revealed for 2002

    4-Jul-2002

    The shortlist for the AJ-backed British Construction Industry Awards 2002 was revealed this week, including a diverse range of publicly funded projects.
  • HOK Sport bets on £180m revamp for Ascot

    4-Jul-2002

    HOK Sport has applied for planning permission for its proposed £180 million revamp of Ascot racecourse in Berkshire. Central to the scheme is the creation of a new grandstand, curved in plan to maximise views. The building sits between the edge of the Royal racecourse and Ascot High Street, with an arched parasol roof in the centre and a series of stepped terraces at each end. A naturally lit internal galleria runs through the centre of the stand to form the main public concourse. ...
  • MJP wins the green light for BBC's broadcasting flagship

    4-Jul-2002

    MacCormack Jamieson Prichard (MJP) has won the go-ahead for its plans to overhaul Broadcasting House - the BBC's West End headquarters.
  • Livingstone London Plan 'unrealistic'

    27-Jun-2002

    London mayor Ken Livingstone's 20-year vision for the capital, the £100 billion London Plan, could prove unachievable, according to his critics.
  • Moore looks to refocus 'lost' Architecture Foundation

    13-Jun-2002

    Architecture critic Rowan Moore has pledged to steer the Architecture Foundation in a new direction when he takes over as director in the autumn.
  • 'Plagiarised' scheme makes it to RA's Summer Exhibition

    13-Jun-2002

    A scheme at the centre of a high-profile plagiarism row has made it into the Royal Academy's Summer Exhibition after the hanging committee failed to recognise it.
  • Record number of RIBA winners

    13-Jun-2002

    The RIBA awards for 2002, announced this week, included a record-breaking number of accolades, with 54 practices picking up gongs for 58 buildings around the country. The awards, which recognise the best buildings completed this year, were announced on Tuesday night. The list of winners forms the long list for this year's Stirling Prize.
  • Avery battles with Rolfe Judd over £20m Victoria project

    6-Jun-2002

    The future of a prime site in central London is in the balance, with local residents and Westminster council in a stand-off.
  • Row rages over new Ritchie towers

    6-Jun-2002

    Secret plans by Ian Ritchie Architects for a tower cluster on a 'hugely prominent' London site have sparked a row between London mayor Ken Livingstone and Southwark council.
  • RIBA president-elect speaks out on Bristol's cinema plans

    30-May-2002

    George Ferguson has launched his first campaign as RIBA president-elect, to save Bristol's historic Whiteladies Picture House.
  • Forget WTC - keep building tall, Arup urges architects

    16-May-2002

    Arup's tall buildings experts have urged architects and developers to keep building tall and not be deterred by safety fears. Extensive research by the engineers following the collapse of the World Trade Center has concluded that skyscrapers, however high, can be made safe against terrorist attacks.
  • University forces inquiry as lab is rejected over safety

    16-May-2002

    Cambridge University is fighting to save its plans for a controversial primate research centre in the face of massive resistance. The university has forced a public inquiry after planners turned down the scheme on safety grounds.
  • ARB accused of election stitch-up

    9-May-2002

    The ARB has been accused of a stitch-up in its forthcoming election of a new chairman.
  • CABE set to play peacemaker in education discussions

    9-May-2002

    Heads of schools have asked CABE to help broker peace in the ongoing education saga.
  • Profession hails Dimbleby's RIBA sustainability challenge

    9-May-2002

    Broadcaster Jonathan Dimbleby last week called on architects to recognise their 'daunting responsibility' to the future - and won the applause of the profession. Dimbleby was delivering the first RIBA annual lecture at its Portland Place headquarters last Wednesday.
  • Big names slam Fisher campaign

    2-May-2002

    RIBA president Paul Hyett has called for strict guidelines over the raising of sponsorship as architecture's heavyweights speak out against the practice. Hyett is demanding that presidential candidates reveal accounts of any cash raised through sponsorship, following news that Annette Fisher has been approaching firms within the construction industry for cash.
  • Huddersfield school hits out at ARB de-validation delay

    2-May-2002

    Huddersfield school of architecture has spoken out against the ARB as it waits for the outcome of its appeal against de-validation.
  • Prince in impassioned plea to save Bishopsgate 'treasures'

    2-May-2002

    Prince Charles has added his voice to the controversy surrounding east London's Bishopsgate Goodsyard, calling for a halt to plans to demolish the Braithswaite Viaduct.
  • PTP rises to £40m Cornish challenge

    2-May-2002

    Percy Thomas Partnership has designed a new university near Falmouth in Cornwall. The £40 million project for the Combined Universities in Cornwall is a collaboration between Falmouth Art College and Exeter University.
  • Libeskind's Spiral on track as V&A begins £150m overhaul

    25-Apr-2002

    Work on Daniel Libeskind's long-awaited Spiral for London's V&A could begin next year along with a comprehensive £150 million makeover of the museum. V&A director Mark Jones pledged his commitment to Libeskind's £50 million building last week. Jones said £31 million was already in place and he was entirely confident the rest would be raised from the Heritage Lottery Fund and private donations.
  • Pavilion brings a touch of Japan to Gunnersbury

    25-Apr-2002

    Kisho Kurokawa plans to bring the East to west London with his design for a Japanese pavilion in Gunnersbury Park.
  • Schools hit by funding bombshell

    25-Apr-2002

    Two leading schools have been stripped of their top research rating amid calls to overhaul the system by which research funding is allocated. The Cambridge School of Architecture and the Bartlett at University College London have fallen from a top five rating to a four. The move will have financial implications for both institutions for the next five years. As well as seeing cuts in their research funding from central government, it will have a knock-on effect with foreign students ...
  • New vision for Elephant and Castle

    18-Apr-2002

    Southwark council has commissioned a new development vision for the regeneration of London's Elephant and Castle after pulling the plug on KP Architects' £1billion masterplan. Tibbalds TM2 is to produce a new plan for the area after the council pulled out of negotiations with developer Southwark Land Regeneration (SLR) last week. SLR won the bid to develop the plan in June 2000, which included designs by Foster and Partners, Ken Yeang, Benoy and HTA Architects.
  • Westminster and Magna in awards reversal of fortunes

    18-Apr-2002

    Wilkinson Eyre's Magna has failed to impress the judges of this year's Civic Trust Awards announced today. The Stirling Prize winner was placed in the trust's third-place 'commendation' category.
  • Farrell severs Swiss Cottage ties

    11-Apr-2002

    Terry Farrell & Partners has pulled out of its £75 million Swiss Cottage scheme, claiming it has been sidelined by developers. The practice said it would have 'no further association' with the north London project, after negotiations with developers Barratt and Dawney Day broke down irrevocably. The moves to reduce its role within the project were against the initial agreement, it said.
  • CABE calls for more changes to Foster's Spitalfields..

    4-Apr-2002

    Foster and Partners latest revisions to its £250 million Spitalfields scheme in London's East End have failed to appease its critics. CABE's design review committee said it was still worried about crucial elements of the design and called for yet more changes.
  • Farrell wins Home Office cost fight

    4-Apr-2002

    Terry Farrell and Partners' Home Office scheme is finally going ahead - but only after a 'protracted' battle over costs.
  • Sellar in 'fight to win' tower vow

    4-Apr-2002

    London Bridge Tower developer Irvine Sellar has put aside cash to fight a public inquiry if secretary of state Stephen Byers decides to call in Renzo Piano's skyscraper scheme.
  • ARB calls for greater powers to police 'architectural' titles

    28-Mar-2002

    NEWS
  • Arsenal stadium defends against fresh legal attack

    28-Mar-2002

    NEWS
  • RIBA presidential candidates slated in three-way debate

    28-Mar-2002

    NEWS
  • City calls for Heron to sue over London Bridge Tower

    21-Mar-2002

    The City's chief planner, Peter Rees, has called on developers behind the Heron Tower to sue the government if Renzo Piano's London Bridge Tower (pictured) gets the green light from secretary of state Stephen Byers.
  • EH holds out a helping hand to preserve Liverpool's heritage

    21-Mar-2002

    English Heritage has launched a 'pioneering' project to protect Liverpool's historic environment and involve the public in planning the city's future.
  • Lots Road scheme faces blackout

    7-Mar-2002

    Terry Farrell & Partners' plans for the £350 million redevelopment of Lots Road power station are facing a major setback as planners prepare for refusal.
  • Allies and Morrison reveals £1.5bn Cricklewood revamp

    28-Feb-2002

    Allies and Morrison is masterplanning a £1.5 billion 'piece of city' for a major north London site that could include a cluster of tall buildings.
  • Alsop dismisses presidential candidates and quits RIBA

    28-Feb-2002

    Will Alsop has condemned the lack of quality candidates for the RIBA presidency and called for members to quit the institute and support the Architecture Foundation instead.
  • CABE and Yentob fume at Westminster planners

    28-Feb-2002

    The BBC has denied it is threatening to quit Westminster after a row over its plans to revamp Broadcasting House.
  • Gensler and SOM axe staff in industry slowdown

    28-Feb-2002

    Commercial practices Gensler and Skidmore Owings & Merrill have both shed staff, another sign of the continuing economic downturn.
  • Prince Charles unveils first of Poundbury-style clones...

    28-Feb-2002

    Prince Charles is advising on the creation of a Cornish 'urban village' - the first in a series of Poundbury-style new towns.
  • Welsh rocked by new Rogers row

    21-Feb-2002

    The future of Welsh finance minister Edwina Hart was uncertain this week following accusations from Richard Rogers Partnership that she misled the assembly over the outcome of a legal dispute about unpaid fees. Hart and RRP have offered conflicting reports of the legal adjudication finding, which the finance minister finally made available to disgruntled assembly members on Friday.
  • Corporation of London savages EH

    17-Jan-2002

    The Corporation of London has called for English Heritage's powers to be drastically curbed and suggested the quango could be merged with CABE. In a savage attack, the corporation claimed that EH interferes in the work of other organisations.
  • Watch this space: BBC follows Bauman Lyons' bus stops plan

    17-Jan-2002

    The BBC is planning a design competition to create bus stops that will get commuters talking and having fun. The brief will be to create a dozen bus stops across central Manchester that will either trigger social interaction or 'persuade people to play'.
  • CABE in New Year spending spree

    10-Jan-2002

    CABE chief executive Jon Rouse has set out an aggressive agenda for the New Year as the commission looks for ways of spending its increased budget, set to double to £4.2 million in April. Rouse told the AJ that first on his shopping list is a significant increase in staffing levels. Specialists in housing, education and research will be a priority.
  • Controversial Murphy fails to tame Circus Lane lions

    10-Jan-2002

    Local residents have blocked plans for a controversial Richard Murphy-designed mews house in Edinburgh. City councillors voted narrowly to reject the scheme against the recommendation of planning officers.
  • Frank Lloyd Wright 'greatest influence' on UK profession

    10-Jan-2002

    Frank Lloyd Wright has influenced more members of the profession than any other architect. In a survey of UK practices, Wright received more than twice the votes of runners-up Sir Michael Hopkins and Lord Foster.
  • Prince gets to grips with Northampton housing vision

    10-Jan-2002

    The Prince's Foundation has been advising on the creation of a 'radical' urban extension to Northampton which could be reproduced across the country, writes Zoë Blackler.
  • Alsop's Puddle Dock booed off stage by 'bunch of luvvies'

    20-Dec-2001

    Will Alsop's first commercial project in the City of London has been held up by 'a bunch of luvvies' whose campaign is the largest ever against any development in the Square Mile.
  • Fosters' 'wobbly bridge' to reopen following 'war delays'

    20-Dec-2001

    Work to repair Foster and Partners' 'wobbly bridge' across the Thames should be complete by March 2002 - 21 months after the £18 million project was first due to open.
  • One-nil to the Arsenal: council backs stadium

    20-Dec-2001

    Arsenal Football Club's plans to relocate to a £250 million stadium by HOK Sport moved a step closer last week after Islington council voted to approve the controversial project.
  • Prince set for New Year offensive

    20-Dec-2001

    Prince Charles looks set to become more vocal about architecture, a move bound to open old wounds and court fresh controversy.Architectural advisor to the prince David Lunts said he expected HRH to raise his profile in the year to come.
  • The RIBA slams ARB over minimum insurance plans ...

    20-Dec-2001

    RIBA council has agreed to 'send out the strongest message' to the ARB that it is against the increases to minimum levels of professional indemnity insurance (PII). President Paul Hyett (left), speaking at last week's council meeting, attacked the rules as illconsidered and said they would do 'the most immense harm' to small practices. 'Let's send a message back that we don't like this, ' he said.
  • ARB puts squeeze on part-timers

    6-Dec-2001

    The ARB has tightened up the rules governing professional indemnity insurance - despite calls for restraint from the RIBA - in a move that could spell the end for part-time practitioners.
  • RIBA's wind turbine hopes blown out by council planners

    6-Dec-2001

    The RIBA's plans to provide a model for sustainable architecture have been foiled by Westminster City Council, which is set to refuse planning permission for two wind turbines on the roof of its headquarters building in Portland Place.
  • Wilkinson Eyre redesigns former spy centre

    6-Dec-2001

    Wilkinson Eyre is to restore the 1960s landmark Empress State building in west London.
  • A telling Tall Storey

    29-Nov-2001

    NEWS: Delegates met at London's Institute of Mechanical Engineers to discuss the future of skyscrapers after 11 September.
  • Helmut Jahn waits in wings with debut UK skyscraper

    22-Nov-2001

    Helmut Jahn has drawn up plans for London's latest 'secret' skyscraper - a speculative 250m, 50-storey office block for the City's eastern cluster.
  • Koolhaas in the clear and set to sue

    8-Nov-2001

    Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas has been cleared of plagiarism after an eight-year legal battle. The Pritzker Prize winner is now considering ways to recover his £500,000 costs - which could include legal action against the expert witness for the case.
  • Pioneering PPP bid process for £50m Manchester centre

    8-Nov-2001

    The Lord Chancellor's Department is choosing from a long list of big-name architects to design its £50 million-plus Manchester Civil Justice Centre in an initiative that will provide a model for future Public Private Partnership arrangements.
  • A&M reveals £175m Tate Modern neighbour

    1-Nov-2001

    Allies and Morrison has revealed £175 million plans for St Christopher House, a speculative office development for the developer Land Securities south of Tate Modern in the Bankside area of London.
  • RIBA presidency: call for shake-up

    1-Nov-2001

    The first serious candidate for the next RIBA presidency has emerged, with another rumoured to be in the wings, as calls come for major reforms to the post. Bristol-based George Ferguson is set to enter the running on a maverick ticket.Meanwhile, president Paul Hyett has recruited another candidate in the ongoing campaign to block Brian Godfrey's bid but refused to publicly identify them.
  • Saltire Society unveils 2001 Housing Award winners

    1-Nov-2001

    The Scottish parliament's minister for social justice, Jackie Baillie, announced the Scottish Saltire Society Housing Awards last week. They are:
  • Wales to have its own design commission by spring 2002

    1-Nov-2001

    Wales is to create its own design commission to champion good design, establish a 'Welsh architecture' and counter negative stereotypes about building in the country.
  • AHR's £25m police training centre ravaged by CABE

    25-Oct-2001

    Abbey Holford Rowe remains committed to its design for a police training centre in Harrogate despite damning criticism from CABE.
  • Rogers accuses minister of lying about assembly costs

    25-Oct-2001

    The row over the Welsh Assembly fiasco has flared up again following accusations by Lord Rogers (left) that finance minster Edwina Hart lied about the spiralling costs of the project.
  • Jencks commissions Rogers in Maggie's Centre network

    18-Oct-2001

    News
  • Railtrack receivership puts station schemes 'in limbo'

    18-Oct-2001

    News
  • Council rises up against new 'business-like' RIBA board . . .

    11-Oct-2001

    RIBA News
  • Architect rapped over failure to provide standard contract

    4-Oct-2001

    NEWS
  • Black firms vie for Ghanaian vision

    4-Oct-2001

    NEWS
  • Chetwood to use windfall to explore cost of green design

    4-Oct-2001

    NEWS
  • NPG in Arup cash row but still in the running for Stirling Prize

    4-Oct-2001

    NEWS
  • UK big guns dig in for downturn

    4-Oct-2001

    NEWS
  • CABE 'not satisfied' by Grimshaws' Paddington plan

    27-Sep-2001

    NEWS
  • London aims high for 20 new towers

    20-Sep-2001

    The architectural profession has rallied behind the concept of skyscrapers in the light of the World Trade Center collapse, as London mayor Ken Livingstone presses forward with plans for up to 20 new towers for the capital. Lord Rogers, Lord Foster and RIBA president Paul Hyett all denied this week that the era of the skyscraper has come to an end.
  • CABE voices concern over PFI

    13-Sep-2001

    With the number of privately funded public buildings set to increase dramatically, CABE commissioners warn that standards for public buildings must improve.
  • Delayed spinnaker tower to set sail in Portsmouth

    6-Sep-2001

    The troubled 'spinnaker tower' (left) in Portsmouth finally looks set to go ahead. If all goes according to plan, the Harrington Design project should start on site next week.
  • Chipperfield lands star role in BFI's new South Bank centre

    16-Aug-2001

    Head of capital projects for the British Film Institute Ian Temple said last week that he firmly expects building work on its new film centre to begin in a year's time on London's South Bank, after David Chipperfield Architects won the competition to design it.
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