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London Metropolitan Department of Architecture

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Under the thoughtful leadership of Robert Mull, the London Metropolitan University department of architecture is one of the most grounded schools in the capital, consistently producing students with both robust pragmatism and acute sensitivity to the complexities of the city

The school

Under the thoughtful leadership of Robert Mull, the London Metropolitan University department of architecture is one of the most grounded schools in the capital, consistently producing students with both robust pragmatism and acute sensitivity to the complexities of the city.

The show

As usual, this year’s show provided lots to chew on, although sometimes little to help wash down the ascetic diet of muted tones and equally muted forms. It often seemed there was such reverence for context that the students’ creative agendas were less developed than their analytical faculties.

The stand-out unit

The Free Unit is perhaps the most interesting part of London Met’s progressive programme, unique in architecture schools in giving students the autonomy to develop a ‘contract’ for the year and choose a series of tutors to guide them through. Although exhibited in a limited form, the work revealed very individual passions, from participatory approaches for community buildings, to mapping church spires through the routes of falcons.

Star students and best use of a brewery

Sam Potts’ playful response to the recession, the Redundant Architects Recreation Association, provided an alternative to trawling the jobs section with a collaborative project space in Clapton – complete with a brewery to drown the sorrows of redundancy.

 

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