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Architects Journal
Robert Booth

  • Death-knell for double glazing in Blair's green push

    8-Mar-2001

    The government this week signalled the demise of standard double glazing as it rushed through new energy efficiency standards for buildings.
  • Egeraat makes UK breakthrough - with mesh

    8-Mar-2001

    Erick van Egeraat Associates (EEA) has won planning permission on its first ever building in the UK - a startling mesh-draped 13,000m 2office scheme in London's Clerkenwell.
  • Government poised to tackle architecture anti-competition

    8-Mar-2001

    The Office of Fair Trading was set to release a report highlighting anti-competitive practices in architecture as the AJ went to press this week.
  • out of office

    8-Mar-2001

    Marco Goldschmied's two-year sojourn as RIBA president is drawing to a close. But he still has a few plans for the institute before he returns full-time to his long career at the Richard Rogers Partnership
  • Pay and hours put girls off design

    8-Mar-2001

    Low starting salaries and long hours are the main factors which deter schoolgirls from pursuing a career in architecture, a government-backed workshop into alternative careers for women revealed last week.
  • US slams door on EU working deal

    8-Mar-2001

    Top-level talks aimed at allowing architects from the EU and the US to practice freely in each others' markets received a hammer blow last week when the American Institute of Architects admitted that a broad-based reciprocity agreement with all 15 European member states is out of the question.
  • It's Hyett! Former AJ columnist clinches the RIBA presidency

    1-Mar-2001

    Paul Hyett has romped home in the race to become the new RIBA president.
  • limited success

    1-Mar-2001

    Last year HLM Architects' ambitious plan to hit the stock market fell through, but chairman Chris Liddle is still convinced that he can beat the profession's 'financial dyslexia' and show how profitable architecture can be
  • New European standard 'will diminish architectural quality'

    1-Mar-2001

    The Architects Registration Board's control of the standard of newly qualified architects is under threat from a European initiative on education, RIBA president Marco Goldschmied warned at last week's ARB board meeting.
  • Raynsford's own department threatens good design pledge

    1-Mar-2001

    Housing minister Nick Raynsford's latest attempt to improve housing design in the UK was hit by claims last week that the government's own planning inspectorate is undermining him.
  • Rogers in 'social cleansing' furore

    1-Mar-2001

    A high-profile lecture by Lord Rogers this month will be targeted by a radical protest group claiming his political work has been instrumental in promoting 'social cleansing' - the process of sweeping away people sleeping rough and other street communities in the name of creating better public spaces.
  • CABE attacks Seifert's 'crude' Royal Victoria Dock scheme

    22-Feb-2001

    The Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment has slated John Seifert & Partners' plans for the Royal Victoria Dock in London, branding them 'crude', 'naive' and 'absurd'.
  • Hyett hits out at schools in RIBA debate on racism

    22-Feb-2001

    RIBA vice-president for education Paul Hyett claimed last week that the majority of architecture schools in the UK are guilty of discriminating against ethnic minorities by relying on A levels as the principle entry criterion.
  • Livingstone stops Gensler's ex-GLC island block project

    22-Feb-2001

    Planning specialists have warned that London mayor Ken Livingstone risks slowing up the planning process after he overturned a planning permission on grounds of architectural design for the first time ever this week.
  • Ray of hope for Crystal Palace multiplex objectors

    22-Feb-2001

    The controversial plan to build a leisure complex on London's Crystal Palace Park was cast into further doubt this week with the news that the developer has agreed to meet a consortium with a radically different approach to the sensitive site.
  • RIBA Council 'votes itself out of job' in constitution shake-up

    22-Feb-2001

    A rearguard action against proposals to diminish the role of the 60-strong RIBA Council failed last week as the institute's ruling body voted in favour of the modernisation of its constitution.
  • Advisors pour cold water on CABE design review proposals

    15-Feb-2001

    The Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment's plan to extend its influence over the quality of design nationwide by introducing design review committees outside London could slow up and confuse the planning process, design advisors to regional authorities have warned.
  • BDP chief blames big PFI losses for profits slump

    15-Feb-2001

    BDP chairman Richard Saxon has branded large PFI contracts 'dangerous beasts' after his practice's failure to win three major projects helped trigger a fall in its pre-tax profits from £1.14 million in 1999 to £525,000 in 2000.
  • New man at V&A falls for Daniel Libeskind's Spiral

    15-Feb-2001

    The new director of the Victoria & Albert Museum has declared himself 'smitten' with Daniel Libeskind's design for the Spiral extension, putting paid to fears that a new broom might sweep away the controversial project.
  • Blair pushes design as vote winner

    8-Feb-2001

    Senior government figures including the prime minister stepped up Labour's commitment to better designed public buildings this week by pledging to use architecture in the fight for greater social equality across the UK.
  • Dixon Jones scoops Magna Carta project at Salisbury

    8-Feb-2001

    Jeremy Dixon.Edward Jones has edged out John Pawson and Peter Zumthor in the troubled competition to build a new home for the Magna Carta at Salisbury Cathedral.
  • Ministers inspect OFT paper on anti-competitive practices

    8-Feb-2001

    A potentially damning report on anti-competitive practices in architecture landed on the desks of cabinet heavyweights Gordon Brown and Stephen Byers late last week.
  • Rogers calls on larger firms to put more into RIBA kitty. . .

    8-Feb-2001

    Lord Rogers has floated controversial plans to beef up the RIBA's finances and give it greater powers to see through his much-vaunted urban renaissance.
  • ARB set to quiz profession in bid to get its priorities right

    1-Feb-2001

    The Architects Registration Board is to run the gauntlet of the profession's opinion of its work by surveying 7,000 architects on what its priorities should be.
  • Calls to scrap 'city architect' post

    1-Feb-2001

    The future of Lord Rogers' position as London's 'city architect' was cast into fresh doubt last week when the capital's elected representatives demanded that mayor Ken Livingstone scrap the £130,000-a-year post because of the potential for conflicts of interest between Lord Rogers' advice and the work of his practice in the capital.
  • Contract killers: architects flout written agreement code

    1-Feb-2001

    More than two thirds of architects working on small projects have breached strict regulations over the use of written contracts, leaving them exposed to prosecution and hefty fines, exclusive AJresearch reveals this week.
  • Bomb threat poser for Gale's Shoreditch Park

    25-Jan-2001

    The prospect of a payload of buried unexploded bombs is one of the obstacles facing Tim Gale Landscape Architects'£2.8 million plans to revive Shoreditch Park in Hackney, east London.
  • Conflict fears hit Rogers' GLA role

    25-Jan-2001

    Lord Rogers' plan to implement his vision of an urban renaissance in London as a paid consultant to the Greater London Authority has been held up by legal wrangles over the possibility of conflicts of interest, the AJ has learned.
  • Good design not cash is key to schools making the grade

    25-Jan-2001

    The link between greater investment in school buildings and the performance of pupils has been thrown into doubt by new research unveiled last week.
  • Now Hyett turns spotlight on Reid's presidential merits

    25-Jan-2001

    RIBA presidential hopeful Paul Hyett this week attempted to cast fresh doubt on Alex Reid's candidacy by describing as 'deeply disturbing' the fact that Reid is still not a registered architect.
  • Wembley design team hit by more political pressure

    25-Jan-2001

    Wembley's chief architect, HOK Sport director Rod Sheard, this week admitted to the 'grief ' and 'tension' in the design team caused by the government's attempt to alter the design of the home of football to provide a permanent home for athletics.
  • Architects remain upbeat, despite slump in workloads

    18-Jan-2001

    Fears of a UK recession following this month's slowdown in the US economy have done little to dent the profession's confidence in its prospects, architects reported last week.
  • Ball faces loss of practice following Eden dismissal

    18-Jan-2001

    The architectural career of Jonathan Ball, who is suing the Eden Project botanical centre in Cornwall for £5.5 million over infringement of his intellectual property rights, is under extreme threat, he admitted this week.
  • Falconer Chester partner dies in light aircraft tragedy

    18-Jan-2001

    Liverpool architect Philip Chester was killed last Saturday in a freak microlight accident during a leisure flight from Liverpool to Stoke.
  • Small practices squeezed out in procurement shake-up

    18-Jan-2001

    Changes in the way public sector buildings are procured have had a devastating effect on small practices, figures to be released by the RIBA later this month will show. Egan-inspired methods of selecting architects and contractors for jobs such as schools and doctors' surgeries have sent the proportion of public-sector work managed by small practices tumbling to just 6 per cent.
  • Tesco: 'Planners stifled our design'

    18-Jan-2001

    The debate over standards in supermarket design escalated last week when the boss of the UK's largest grocer appeared to blame planners for forcing him into accepting a 'compromise' design for a major new store.
  • ARB set to sharpen teeth with new penalties list. . .

    11-Jan-2001

    The Architects Registration Board is considering the introduction of a raft of minor punishments for architects whose misdemeanours are currently overlooked by its disciplinary system.
  • DETR stung by Audit Office's call for greater coordination

    11-Jan-2001

    The National Audit Office has rebuked John Prescott's department for taking a poorly coordinated approach to achieving improvement in the performance of the construction industry.
  • First Cardiff, now Cornwall as cash crisis hits Gaia Centre

    11-Jan-2001

    Edward Cullinan Architects' plans for a visitor centre to illustrate cutting-edge sustainable building techniques have been radically scaled back because key elements of its environmentally friendly design cost too much. The AJ has learnt that control of the Gaia Centre scheme in Cornwall has been handed over to a design and build contractor. Cullinan partner Robin Nicholson branded the move 'deeply frustrating' and even compared the decision to the rejection of Zaha Hadid's designs ...
  • RIBA Council session hijacked by more presidency spats

    21-Dec-2000

    The war of words in the RIBA's presidential election campaign hotted up at the final council meeting of the year last week when candidate Paul Hyett branded opponent Brian Godfrey 'a mythical figure' and issued a thinly veiled attack on Alex Reid's time as director general at Portland Place.
  • where there's a will. . .

    21-Dec-2000

    Losing your way may not be a matter of life and death but for Dutch wayfinder Paul Mijksenaar it is a constant fear. His work has an unobtrusive presence that focuses on navigation rather than architectural expression by robert booth. photograph by guy jo
  • by royal appointment

    7-Dec-2000

    Prince's Foundation chief executive David Lunts enjoys the Bauhaus qualities of the foundation while wholeheartedly supporting Prince Charles' often-contentious emphasis on traditional values by robert booth. photograph by guy jordan
  • Damilola: could better design have saved his life?

    7-Dec-2000

    The Peckham housing blocks where 10-year-old Damilola Taylor lived and died are to be demolished next year. The buildings have been earmarked for demolition as part of a £160 million rebuilding programme on the North Peckham Estate masterplanned and designed by Pollard Thomas & Edwards Architects. The rebuilding programme is almost halfway through but the fact that Damilola lived in one of the original 1965 buildings designed by Camberwell Council sparked a debate this week over ...
  • De Rijke earns gold star for schoolwork

    7-Dec-2000

    De Rijke Marsh Morgan Architects has unveiled its government-backed plan to redesign Kingsdale School in Dulwich, south London.
  • Lord Rogers seeks help to attract more women recruits

    7-Dec-2000

    Richard Rogers Partnership is failing to recruit enough female architects and needs help to level out the six-to-one ratio between men and women, Lord Rogers has admitted.
  • New V&A home for RIBA drawings collection

    7-Dec-2000

    RIBA president Marco Goldschmied was today set to sign a preliminary agreement on a 100-year lease with the Victoria & Albert Museum to provide a new home for the institute's collection of more than a million drawings and manuscripts. The deal came as architect Wright & Wright unveiled details of the £5 million plan to convert a series of rooms in the Grade I-listed museum's Henry Cole wing to house the collection.
  • Picture this: presidents'portraits out for modern RIBA

    7-Dec-2000

    In the clearest sign yet that the RIBA is determined to shake off its gentleman's club image, plans are being laid to take down the portraits of past presidents at its Portland Place headquarters.
  • Rogers out of toon in Newcastle

    7-Dec-2000

    Lord Rogers'plans to engineer an urban renaissance in Newcastle's rundown west end estates collapsed at the weekend, amid complaints from the public that his proposals were too dictatorial and warnings that architects are biting off more than they can chew on masterplan schemes.
  • Tenant design initiative aims to spruce up social housing

    7-Dec-2000

    Council tenants are to be given free access to architects to help them tidy up their homes and neighbourhoods in an initiative to be launched next year.
  • Lack of cash threatens UK mission

    30-Nov-2000

    On the eve of UK architecture's biggest ever international showcase, leading figures at the RIBA and the RIAS have warned that their institutions are too strapped for cash to effectively promote architects'interests abroad.
  • Murdoch making headlines over the news of the wharf

    30-Nov-2000

    Media mogul Rupert Murdoch is heading for a showdown with the London Borough of Lewisham over the redevelopment of Convoy Wharf, a government-protected Thameside area the size of the South Bank Centre.
  • Ombudsman launches inquiry into planning racism claims

    30-Nov-2000

    The parliamentary ombudsman has launched an investigation into claims that government officials 'improperly' blocked a planning application for a £120 million black and ethnic minority performing arts centre.
  • School's out for Ellis Williams as governors reject PFI plans

    30-Nov-2000

    Hawkins/Brown's plans to refurbish and extend Pimlico School received a boost this week when the school's governors threw out plans for a demolition and rebuild plan under the Private Finance Initiative.
  • Birmingham follows Peckham to book new £60m library

    23-Nov-2000

    Just a fortnight after Peckham Library scooped the Stirling Prize, Birmingham City Council has revealed plans to launch an architectural competition for its own £60 million library.
  • GLA blasts Foster's 'glass headlamp'

    23-Nov-2000

    Greater London Assembly members this week warned they may abandon plans to inhabit Foster and Partners' headlamp-shaped headquarters building after branding it 'an eyecatching folly that will fail the needs of London government'.
  • Mecanoo looks to Auntie to land its big break in UK

    23-Nov-2000

    The BBC is set to go Dutch for its new £30 million Scottish headquarters and shortlist Delft-based practice Mecanoo from a list of 73 submissions.
  • Parry puts final piece in Paternoster jigsaw

    23-Nov-2000

    Eric Parry Architects and Sheppard Robson have finally won planning permission for the largest building at Paternoster Square, the City of London's most sensitive development.
  • Rogers calls for voice to make Blair feel urban lobby FORCE

    23-Nov-2000

    The government's key architectural adviser Lord Rogers has revealed plans to create a powerful urban lobby group which will rank alongside high-profile environmental campaigners such as Greenpeace and Friends of the Earth.
  • Urban White Paper: could do better

    23-Nov-2000

    Government measures to encourage an urban renaissance have been attacked by Lord Rogers, who argues that they fall short on crucial issues and will not do enough
  • Ball bounces back to lodge multimillion-pound Eden writ

    16-Nov-2000

    The charitable trust behind the Eden Project botanical centre in Cornwall is facing a £5.5 million lawsuit from the project's co-founder, Jonathan Ball.
  • Foster's 'wobbly' bridge out of action until next autumn

    16-Nov-2000

    The 'wobbly'Millennium Bridge looks likely to be closed until at least September 2001, a senior member of the design team told the AJ last week.
  • Piano tower hits the right note with Livingstone

    16-Nov-2000

    The selection of Renzo Piano to lead the design team for Europe's tallest skyscraper paid off immediately last week when London mayor Ken Livingstone gave the 390m building his backing.
  • Profession hails Brown's £1bn city-friendly measures

    16-Nov-2000

    After months of complaints that the government has ignored cities, architects and developers last week welcomed Gordon Brown's £1 billion pre-budget package for urban regeneration.
  • Urban White Paper boosts CABE

    16-Nov-2000

    Deputy prime minister John Prescott was today set to put the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (CABE) at the centre of the government's long-awaited plans for an urban renaissance in the UK.
  • CABE in Home Office HQ warning

    9-Nov-2000

    The Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment has issued a thinly-veiled warning to the government that its much-vaunted 'better public buildings'policy could be undermined by weaknesses in the plans for the new Home Office headquarters.CABE published its views on Terry Farrell & Partners' design for the Marsham Street scheme on Monday and warned that planning restrictions and the design brief had produced 'an unsatisfactory situation'over the the scheme.
  • 'Mini Pompidou'wins Stirling but planners take a bashing

    9-Nov-2000

    Alsop & Stormer's Peckham Library and Media Centre scooped the £20,000 Stirling Prize last Saturday, sparking bitter attacks from the practice on local authority planners who block ambitious architecture.
  • New graduates are not up to scratch, says profession

    9-Nov-2000

    Newly-qualified architects are falling a long way short of the profession's expectations, according to new research issued by the RIBA last week. In a survey of 225 experienced architects, two thirds said that they are not 'totally confident' in the skills and abilities of newly-qualified architects until they have been working for at least two years.More than half of that number said that it takes longer than three years until new starters become confident.
  • Architects 'lagging behind' in information technology

    2-Nov-2000

    A group of major practices has warned that architects are falling years behind the rest of the design industry in the use of computer technology.
  • Livingstone brands RHWL Crystal Palace 'cheapskate'

    2-Nov-2000

    London mayor Ken Livingstone last week waded into the controversy about the multiplex leisure development at Crystal Palace Park. He branded its current architects RHWL 'cheapskate' and warned that they will 'downgrade the development'.
  • Raynsford lobbied for greater protection of title

    2-Nov-2000

    Construction minister Nick Raynsford is under increasing pressure from architects and consumers to crack down on non-architects using titles such as 'architectural consultant' and 'architectural services'. The Architects Registration Board will later this month present the government with a dossier of information outlining a case for extending its powers to protect the title of architect. Today, the ARB can only prosecute designers who call themselves 'architect', even if others fulfil ...
  • studied mayhem

    2-Nov-2000

    Nick Hayhurst and Beth Kay are out to use the RIBA to make architecture students' lives better. They have secured institute support for a minimum wage for students, and are currently planning future campaigns by robert booth. photograph by david richards
  • The clever money is heading Walsall's way

    2-Nov-2000

    Bookmaker William Hill said the level of betting on the Stirling Prize has been in the 'hundreds of pounds' rather than the thousands, but expects it to become as important as the Turner or the Booker Prize. Much of the support among the profession, meanwhile, is tallying with the bookies and heading Walsall's way.
  • ARB rules out expansionism as resignations continue

    26-Oct-2000

    Future Systems' partner Amanda Levete has resigned from the ruling council of the Architects Registration Board for the second time.
  • Chapman Taylor swoops for £500m Bristol retail spree

    26-Oct-2000

    Developers last week ditched a proposal by Benoy to redevelop the 1950s Broadmead shopping centre in Bristol and handed the £500 million scheme to Chapman Taylor.
  • Deputy PM Prescott to back architecture centres network

    26-Oct-2000

    Deputy prime minister John Prescott is to strengthen the network of local architecture centres in the UK and establish regional resource centres to improve urban design skills among architects and planners, the AJ has learnt.
  • Dome facing fresh cash crisis over demolition of contents

    26-Oct-2000

    The beleaguered New Millennium Experience Company (NMEC) is bracing itself for an extra £15 million loss when the contents of the Millennium Dome are ripped out.
  • Stephen Lawrence bursaries flop through lack of interest

    26-Oct-2000

    Attempts to boost the number of black and ethnic minority architects received a hammer blow this week when it emerged that £18,000 worth of special student bursaries have gone to waste because of a lack of candidates.
  • Vice president urges Alex Reid to forget RIBA's top job

    26-Oct-2000

    RIBA vice president John Wright last week demanded that Alex Reid should back out of the race to become RIBA president.
  • CABE chief sounds 'blot on the landscape'hospitals warning

    19-Oct-2000

    A string of new hospitals across the country are heading for design disaster, the chairman of the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment, Sir Stuart Lipton, has warned.
  • Devon man Godfrey joins RIBA race

    19-Oct-2000

    Small practitioner Brian Godfrey is set to join the race to become RIBA president. The 64-year-old RIBA council member is planning to stand with policies which will challenge the RIBA's London bias and favour small practices.
  • passionate times

    19-Oct-2000

    For Daniel Libeskind, with projects in six countries around the world, nowhere is home but he is attracted by the 'new cultural impulse in architecture' in the UK and the exciting atmosphere of London in particular by robert booth
  • South Bank cuts controversial commercial developments

    19-Oct-2000

    The South Bank Centre (SBC) is planning to slash the volume of proposed development on its Jubilee Gardens and Hungerford car park sites.
  • BBC tunes in to design - by choosing 21 of the best

    12-Oct-2000

    The BBC has this week finalised a list of 21 practices for its framework agreement. It includes 'superstar'practices such as Foster and Partners, Alsop & Stormer and MacCormac Jamieson Prichard, as well as more commercial designers such as EPR Architects, Aukett Europe and Building Design Partnership.
  • Chancellor Brown pushes brownfield incentives ahead

    12-Oct-2000

    Chancellor Gordon Brown has hinted that he may cut stamp duty on brownfield housing developments in his pre-Budget statement next month.
  • RIBA cuts costs as lecture programme is farmed out

    12-Oct-2000

    The RIBA may be forced to cut back on its popular lecture programme at Portland Place next year.
  • South Bank remodelling up for grabs in new competitions

    12-Oct-2000

    The South Bank Centre (SBC) this week launched two major architectural competitions for the overhaul of its prime 4ha site between the London Eye and Waterloo Bridge.
  • 'Victory' for students with RIBA minimum-wage deal

    12-Oct-2000

    Student campaigners struck a blow for fairer pay last week when they persuaded the RIBA to introduce a minimum wage for the first time.
  • Blair boost for British design

    5-Oct-2000

    Prime Minister Tony Blair delivered a massive boost to the architecture lobby this week when he pledged to radically improve the standard of public buildings and to leave 'a legacy that can match the best of what we inherited from the Victorians'.
  • RIBA targets political parties in preelection manifesto push

    5-Oct-2000

    The RIBA is to publish a 'Manifesto for Architects' in an attempt to raise its political profile before the general election. The policy will focus on sustainability, architects' involvement in the planning process, the importance of design-led development and urban regeneration. The ideas will be lobbied for inclusion in the parties' election manifestos, and will form the basis for demands for a full UKarchitecture policy from the next government as a published white paper, said RIBA's ...
  • rousing welcome

    5-Oct-2000

    As the first chief executive of CABE, Jon Rouse is looking to unite the building environment professions. He believes his achievement in getting disparate groups to sign up to the Urban Task Force report is a good grounding
  • Ulster architects angry at Belfast BBC's English imports

    28-Sep-2000

    Northern Ireland's architectural community launched an attack on the BBC last week after the broadcaster overlooked local practices in the competition to design a £7 million expansion of its Belfast headquarters.
  • Ken offers capital as 'trial city' for Urban Task Force

    21-Sep-2000

    London mayor Ken Livingstone last week rebuked the government for 'pigeon-holing' Lord Rogers' ideas for urban renewal and revealed that the brief for his new architectural adviser is no less than 'to rebuild London'.
  • Mixed results in 'design saves money' CABE report. . .

    21-Sep-2000

    British Airways' architect-designed headquarters is producing savings of £15 million a year through increased productivity, reduced staff turnover and resulted in less sick leave, according to research being cited as an example in the latest attempt to 'prove' design's worth.
  • african resistance

    14-Sep-2000

    Nigerian architect and one-time president of the International Union of Architects Olufemi Majekodunmi has offices in three African states but still takes time to speak up for international members at RIBA council meetings by robert booth
  • Goldschmied hits back at Prince

    14-Sep-2000

    RIBA president Marco Goldschmied has attacked Prince Charles as 'extremely misinformed' after the Prince described twentieth-century architecture as 'genetically modified' and labelled the profession 'self-referential and self-congratulatory'.
  • Think tank accuses PFI of 'off-the-shelf 'hospital design

    14-Sep-2000

    Decisions on hospital design should be removed from local NHS trusts' authority and handed to a specialist group of professionals led by a figure such as Lord Rogers, an influential health care think tank said last week.
  • Art Deco bingo hall goes rubber for clubbers

    7-Sep-2000

    Harper Mackay spin-off HM2 has won planning permission and listed building consent to convert a disused 1934 Gaumont Odeon in north London into a nightclub. The Grade II*-listed Wood Green cinema has stood empty for four years following a stint as a bingo hall and now leisure operator Po Na Na is planning to spend almost £1 million on bringing it back into use.
  • Dobson backs racism inquiry

    7-Sep-2000

    London MP Frank Dobson has backed black architect Elsie Owusu in her campaign against the capital's planning authorities, which she claims have demonstrated 'institutional racism'.
  • RIBA slams William Hague for return to 'style police'

    7-Sep-2000

    The RIBA has warned of the return of the 'style police' following the publication of new Tory policies which could force architects to use local styles and local materials on new housing.
  • Spring fears could pull the plug on Bath spa project

    7-Sep-2000

    Nicholas Grimshaw & Partners' £19 million scheme to return Bath's spa to public use has run into trouble after local conservationists threatened to block the project with legal action this week.
  • Marco's mid-term report: must try harder?

    31-Aug-2000

    RIBA president Marco Goldschmied has just 10 months of his term left to run at Portland Place - so the AJ asked him and his peers to deliver a half-time report on his performance so far, with marks out of 10
  • Profession rocked by sex pest case

    31-Aug-2000

    A female architect who claims colleagues called her 'the bitch' and told her to wear skirts rather than trousers to show off her legs, is to take legal action against her employer in a potential landmark case for the profession.
  • London to adopt Barcelona model

    17-Aug-2000

    London is set to follow Barcelona's example and have its architecture policy guided by a panel of international architects, according to the capital's new 'city architect', Lord Rogers.
  • Prince Charles aims to kick racism out of architecture

    17-Aug-2000

    The Prince of Wales is set to speak out on racism in architecture next month when he delivers the inaugural Stephen Lawrence Memorial Lecture. The lecture will take place on 7 September at the prince's newly opened architecture foundation in Shoreditch, east London, and will precede a debate on architecture and its commitment to an integrated community in Britain.
  • RHWL replaces Ritchie on Crystal Palace multiplex

    17-Aug-2000

    Ian Ritchie Architects has been replaced by RHWL on the troubled £60 million Crystal Palace Park leisure scheme.
  • Architect attacks 'racist' planners

    3-Aug-2000

    The architect of a planned £120 million arts centre for ethnic minorities in north London has accused the capital's planning authorities of 'institutional racism' after the scheme was controversially shelved last month.
  • Architect vows to fight ruling after ARB misconduct wrap

    3-Aug-2000

    Geoffrey Tournoff, a sole practitioner from Farnham, Surrey, has been fined £800 by the Architects Registration Board (ARB) for lying to a client and failing to work to a written contract.
  • RIBA urged to kick racism off UK architecture scene

    3-Aug-2000

    The Society of Black Architects (SOBA) has demanded that the RIBA acts now to improve the representation of architects from ethnic minorities among practices and to provide funding to improve its mentoring scheme which links practising architects with students from ethnic minorities.
  • wise up to risks

    3-Aug-2000

    Pushing the boundaries of design means taking risks. Chris Wise, Arup's conceptual designer for the Millennium Bridge, is happy to accept the challenge and has even enshrined it in his new company's name, Expedition by robert booth.
  • ARB set to get tough on unqualified architects

    27-Jul-2000

    The Architects Registration Board is to get tough on architects attempting to practice without a Part 3 professional qualification.
  • Marco: government's green man?

    27-Jul-2000

    RIBA president Marco Goldschmied has made an ambitious bid to advise Tony Blair directly on sustainable development.
  • RIBA all set for root and branch transformation . . .

    27-Jul-2000

    RIBA president Marco Goldschmied threw his weight behind a major overhaul of the institute's public face and management systems last week by declaring that a branding exercise will be the main priority for his second and last year in office.
  • Artist Johnston unveils Reiach & Hall studio

    20-Jul-2000

    Internationally acclaimed artist Alan Johnston has used buildings around the world as the backdrop for his installations, but the next piece of architecture to play host to his work looks set to be located no further than the bottom of his Edinburgh garden.
  • Bring back architect-planner role, urges Goldschmied

    20-Jul-2000

    RIBA president Marco Goldschmied last week called for a return to the role of the architect-planner as the RIBA, CABE and key professional institutions in the building industry launched a rethink of the way urban designers are trained.
  • CABE attacks Paternoster plan

    20-Jul-2000

    The Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment has reignited controversy over the highly sensitive £150 million Paternoster Square development in the City by slamming the new design for the scheme's largest building, by Eric Parry Architects with Sheppard Robson.
  • CABE review committee pans practices over latest designs

    20-Jul-2000

    Gensler, Chapman Taylor Partners and Haskoll & Company each came under fire from the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (CABE) this week when its design review committee publicly attacked the practices' latest designs.
  • Crest brings in Cullinan for troubled Canon's Marsh job

    20-Jul-2000

    Edward Cullinan Architects has promised to listen to Bristol residents over its designs for the £300 million redevelopment of Canon's Marsh in the city centre after it was drafted in to revive the troubled development last week . The prac t ice has been p icked to masterp lan the s ite after Arup Associates was dropped by developer Crest Nicholson in May, following a high-profile local campaign against its scheme and planning rejections.
  • Extra! Extra! A&M rejigs LCP

    13-Jul-2000

    Allies and Morrison has unveiled a major redesign of the London College of Printing at the Elephant and Castle, one of the first major regeneration projects in the run-down area.
  • Gensler reveals £75m Edinburgh blueprint

    13-Jul-2000

    Gensler faces a tense meeting with the Scottish Royal Fine Art Commission next week over its competition-winning design for a £75 million office, housing, retail and arts centre complex just off the Royal Mile in Edinburgh.
  • RIAS plans competition for new expanded HQ building

    13-Jul-2000

    The Royal Incorporation of Architects in Scotland is considering moving out of its Georgian town house headquarters and commissioning a new larger building.
  • Rogers rubbishes 'ineffectual' RIBA

    13-Jul-2000

    Lord Rogers has launched an astonishing attack on the RIBA and demanded a huge overhaul of the way it works.
  • 'Sprawling'academics take brownfield strategists to task

    13-Jul-2000

    A bitter row erupted at the RIBA annual conference last weekend between supporters of the Urban Task Force and academics who said that the future of cities lies in greater suburbanisation rather than increasing inner city density.
  • developers win City backing

    6-Jul-2000

    The controversial 41-storey 'gherkin' tower by Foster and Partners received the backing of City of London planners on Tuesday, signalling defeat for conservationists and victory for developers who want to build tall in the Square Mile.
  • Bore from Brum spurns 'world-class architecture'

    29-Jun-2000

    Birmingham City Council leader Albert Bore last week ruled out building 'world-class architecture' as a spur to regeneration in the city, and said that landmark buildings similar to Frank Gehry's Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao would not feature in Birmingham.
  • Foster and Yeang land £1bn Elephant and Castle prize

    29-Jun-2000

    A masterplan by KP Architects including designs by Foster and Partners has been picked for the £1 billion regeneration of the Elephant and Castle in south London.
  • Jestico + Whiles first in line for £60m Camden Tube job

    29-Jun-2000

    Jestico + Whiles will next month show planners early designs for a potentially controversial redevelopment of Camden Town underground station featuring a major new air rights development.
  • Marco: ignore EC brownfield rule

    29-Jun-2000

    RIBA president Marco Goldschmied has called on the government to shun a European ruling which threatens the Urban Task Force's plans on urban regeneration.
  • Rolfe Judd slams CABE for 'steamrollering' design review

    29-Jun-2000

    Rolfe Judd Architects has hit back at the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (CABE) after it criticised the practice's regeneration scheme for four blocks east of King's Cross station in London (AJ 15.6.00).
  • ARB accused of wasting money in conduct case

    22-Jun-2000

    The Architects' Registration Board (ARB) came under renewed fire for wasting time and money last week when it was forced to abandon a landmark professional conduct committee case due to lack of evidence.
  • Herzog & de Meuron vows to put Tate scheme in the shade

    22-Jun-2000

    The architect of the Tate Modern, Herzog & de Meuron, last week pledged to eclipse the architectural success of its Bankside conversion with a design for a new dance centre, in south east London.
  • Listing threat to £440m Vauxhall housing masterplan

    22-Jun-2000

    A £440 million plan to build a new 'urban village' on the site of decaying housing estates in Lambeth, south London, has been thrown into doubt after culture minister Alan Howarth announced plans to award Grade II-listed status to a 1960s secondary school on the site.
  • RFAC warned Fosters about wobbly bridge two years ago

    22-Jun-2000

    Foster and Partners and Ove Arup & Partners were warned as far back as February 1998 that the Millennium Bridge might require reinforcement to make it safe and to counter vibrations.
  • Waging war on 'forces of mediocrity'

    22-Jun-2000

    The awards ceremony last week for the best architecture exhibits at the Royal Academy 'Summer Exhibition 2000' was enlivened by a sparky debate on whether London's architecture is thriving or failing. And one of the driving forces behind the Jubilee Line Extension (JLE), London Transport chief executive Denis Tunnicliffe, took the opportunity to hit out at 'forces of mediocrity' in the capital.
  • adriaan geuze

    15-Jun-2000

    Landscape designer Adriaan Geuze of West 8 has a colourful and dramatic vision for the new park at the South Bank. His enthusiam, passion and experience are robust counterpoints to the criticisms of residents by robert booth. photograph by kees van son
  • Allies and Morrison lands £100m BBC White City job

    15-Jun-2000

    Allies and Morrison has brushed off challenges from John McAslan & Partners and Ian Ritchie Architects to win the commission for a new flagship office and broadcast centre for the BBC.
  • Bridge wobbles force new closure

    15-Jun-2000

    Lord Foster last week brushed off a £1 million loss on the Millennium Bridge, which closed for an indefinite period this week after heavy pedestrian traffic caused the bridge to twist, throwing its users off balance.
  • RIAS looks to recruit exiled Scots

    15-Jun-2000

    The Royal Incorporation of Architects in Scotland (RIAS) is set to change its name in a bid to claim the membership of hundreds of Scottish architects who are working in the rest of the UK.
  • Sainsbury's sticks with big names for £900m spree

    15-Jun-2000

    Supermarket operator J Sainsbury has appointed a string of major architects as part of a new £900 million capital expenditure programme, shrugging off fears that a 23 per cent fall in profit would mean an end to its policy of appointing big-name practices.
  • £400m Rogers renaissance in the works for Newcastle

    8-Jun-2000

    Richard Rogers and Andrew Wright, two of the driving forces behind the Urban Task Force (UTF), have unveiled a radical masterplan for Newcastle on Tyne’s run-down west end, which includes 10,000 new homes and a new tram service to the city centre.
  • Crest hints it will go for Ferguson Mann in Bristol

    8-Jun-2000

    Ferguson Mann's £200 million alternative scheme for the troubled Bristol harbourside development was given a major boost last week when the site's developer strongly hinted it could be used to help replace the scrapped Arup Associates masterplan.
  • Farrell backs exhibition on genetics at Centre for Life

    8-Jun-2000

    Terry Farrell, architect of the newly opened Centre for Life in Newcastle, last week defended its exhibition on genetics after a group of anti-genetic modification protesters targeted the centre's opening celebrations.
  • Walsall seeks more quality in £25m design competition

    8-Jun-2000

    Walsall will next month launch a £25 million urban design competition for four key sites, after its council chiefs demanded that design should play a greater part in the planning process.
  • Fall and rise of London Bridge

    1-Jun-2000

    While Ken Livingstone hesitates over whether to take up residence in Foster and Partners' Greater London Assembly (GLA) building at London Bridge, plans are pressing ahead to revitalise the area around it.
  • Finsbury Health Centre in £2M critical care plea

    1-Jun-2000

    Lubetkin and Tecton's 1938 Modernist landmark, Finsbury Health Centre, is under threat after it emerged that Camden and Islington NHS Trust which runs it, is struggling to find the £2 million needed for vital maintenance.
  • Online match-maker seeks joint venture with RIBA

    1-Jun-2000

    Improveline.com, the online client and contractor match-making service, is planning to approach the RIBA over a possible joint initiative.
  • ARB to urge Raynsford for law change on misuse of title

    25-May-2000

    The Architects Registration Board (ARB) is to step up its efforts to change the Architects Act 1997 and clamp down on the misuse of the title 'architect'.
  • Livingstone thinks again about GLA Foster building

    25-May-2000

    London Mayor Ken Livingstone held talks this week to consider alternative homes for the Greater London Assembly after he warned that the Foster and Partners-designed building at London Bridge City may not be 'best value for Londoners'.
  • RIBA rules out minimum wage for design students

    25-May-2000

    Proposals to introduce a minimum wage for student architects were rejected last week by the RIBA's ruling council after deep splits emerged between council members on the issue.
  • richard hastilow

    25-May-2000

    With 32 years in the Royal Navy behind him, the new chief executive of the RIBA, Richard Hastilow, is ready to steer the institute into calm waters. With his key political contacts, will it be plain sailing? by robert booth. photograph by ross young
  • All change at London's Elephant and Castle

    18-May-2000

    Three development teams last week took the wraps off controversial plans to demolish around 500 council homes as part of a £1 billion attempt to convert the Elephant & Castle in London into a vibrant urban centre.
  • BBC pulls the plug on HQ architects for new trio

    18-May-2000

    The BBC last week delivered a £100 million snub to EPR, Aukett Europe and RMJM and scrapped their proposals for a major new building at White City, west London.
  • Grimshaw's giant £75m Eden project set to grow

    18-May-2000

    Nicholas Grimshaw and Partners' Eden Project in Cornwall is set to almost double in size under new plans being drawn up for the giant greenhouse development.
  • Star-studded Architecture Week set for 9 June lift-off

    18-May-2000

    This year's Pritzker Prize winner Rem Koolhaas, has been lined up to speak in London during Architecture Week. The celebrated Dutchman, made famous by his Maison a Bordeaux and his book, S, M, L, XL will be flying into London to talk at his former school, the Architectural Association on 9 June. Tickets will be available from 1 June and are expected to sell out fast.
  • Birmingham becomes a truly model city

    11-May-2000

    The bulldozers are set to move in on Birmingham's Bull Ring, but before they do photographer Tom Merilion has produced a startling new view of the city's concrete buildings as their idealist 1960s planners would have seen them.
  • Crest drops Arups in Bristol

    11-May-2000

    news
  • Livingstone win jeopardises Ritchie's Crystal Palace plans

    11-May-2000

    news
  • Shrimps muddy the finances of Foster's river crossing

    11-May-2000

    news
  • 'ARB prejudiced my conduct case'

    4-May-2000

    An architect facing a charge of serious professional incompetence has accused the Architects Registration Board of seriously prejudicing his case before he was due to face arb's professional conduct committee this week.
  • Faith Zone looks at divine new life in post-Dome future

    27-Apr-2000

    news
  • Grimshaw's FT building made into 'dot com' powerhouse

    27-Apr-2000

    news
  • Mayoral trio slam Ritchie's Crystal Palace multiplex

    27-Apr-2000

    The leading candidates for London Mayor have attacked plans for a 20- screen multiplex on Crystal Palace Park designed by Ian Ritchie Architects.
  • Wembley towers find new home - at rugby museum

    27-Apr-2000

    news
  • BBC moves to put design first in property portfolio shake-up

    20-Apr-2000

    The bbc's new £300 million property partner will be shut out of major design decisions for a giant new building at White City in London despite plans to introduce a more joined-up approach to property development across the corporation.
  • Rogers on his way to Wembley

    20-Apr-2000

    The Richard Rogers Partnership has been asked to masterplan the area around Foster and Partners' new Wembley stadium, the aj has learned.
  • Bidders say government can expect big loss on Dome sale

    13-Apr-2000

    The government can only expect to net between £50 million and £150 million on the sale of the Millennium Dome and its surrounding land, private sector bidders said last week.
  • Cultural Phoenix shows new Irish direction

    13-Apr-2000

    A new government building in Dublin is set to shake up the dusty, monolithic image of state accommodation and offer locals and tourists great views of Dublin and a series of cultural venues.
  • South Bank multi-project makeover revealed

    13-Apr-2000

    Lifschutz Davidson has taken the wraps off plans for a giant 42- project makeover for London's South Bank, including major new multimillion pound buildings and a number of small-scale schemes between Lambeth bridge and Blackfriars bridge.
  • Westminster privatises planning

    13-Apr-2000

    news
  • Alsop in £800m Rotterdam win

    6-Apr-2000

    Alsop & Stormer looked set to scoop the £800 million masterplanning brief for Rotterdam city centre ahead of Rem Koolhaas' practice oma and Foster & Partners as the aj went to press this week.
  • Cardiff pulls the plug on Alsop's landscape scheme

    6-Apr-2000

    Alsop & Stormer's plans for a £900,000 landscaping scheme around its newly built Cardiff Bay Barrage could be left in tatters by the winding up of the Cardiff Bay Development Company at the end of this month.
  • Enfield Council under fire over flat's balcony collapse

    6-Apr-2000

    News
  • Mayoral hopefuls savage Foster's GLA building plans

    6-Apr-2000

    News
  • RIBA reveals new V&A architecture centre plans

    6-Apr-2000

    News
  • Scottish architect rebuffs £500 ARB misconduct fine

    6-Apr-2000

    Edinburgh architect David McGill of McGill & Co has steadfastly refused to pay a £500 fine imposed on him last week for unacceptable professional conduct by the Architects Registration Board.
  • Scottish parliament on the brink

    6-Apr-2000

    News
  • Timpson Manley wins Walthamstow redesign

    6-Apr-2000

    Timpson Manley last week won the competition to design the masterplan for Walthamstow town centre in east London.
  • Belfast embraces design as ship-building dwindles

    16-Mar-2000

    Uncertainty over the future of ship-building in Belfast last week looked set to trigger a spate of new architectural commissions to redevelop sites left vacant by the dwindling industry.
  • EPR's Spitalfields body of work

    16-Mar-2000

    EPR Architects last week unveiled its second office design for the historic Spitalfields area of London as developers warned of a £500,000 bill for the removal of thousands of medieval corpses found buried on the site.
  • EU set for 'switch building' boom

    16-Mar-2000

    Sheppard Robson is in talks with engineer Buro Happold and UK interior fit-out contractor Churchfield in a bid to swoop on a new £20 billion building boom triggered by a surge in European Internet traffic.
  • Manchester announces Piccadilly Gardens five

    16-Mar-2000

    John McAslan & Partners, Allies & Morrison, Stanton Williams, Stephenson/Bell and Lifschutz Davidson have all been shortlisted to design a 14,000m 2building on Manchester's Piccadilly Gardens.
  • Architects slam Prescott's 'simplistic' greenfield tax...

    9-Mar-2000

    Architects have attacked as simplistic a government plan to slap a £500 million annual tax on new greenfield housing.
  • Athletics bodies race for London Olympics venue

    9-Mar-2000

    News
  • Crystal Palace 'minority' offers alternative to Ritchie

    9-Mar-2000

    News
  • Norris goes for architecture vote

    9-Mar-2000

    News
  • Shed KM teams up for Fort Dunlop regeneration

    9-Mar-2000

    News
  • City fears precedent set over blocked Foster tower

    2-Mar-2000

    NEWS
  • Cullinan unveils radical 'grid shell' wooden eco-building

    2-Mar-2000

    Construction work is set to start on a radical 'grid shell' wooden building which uses 10 times less timber than a normal wood design.
  • Architects left out of attempts to cut down crime by design

    24-Feb-2000

    NEWS
  • European Research Institute (Birmingham)

    24-Feb-2000

    Work is set to start on this Fielden Clegg-designed European Research Institute at Birmingham University. The 4800m 2building features an innovative ventilation system which uses the building's thermal mass to regulate internal temperatures. Air is passed through the cores of the structure's pre-cast concrete planks to either cool the air in summer or warm it in winter. The building still uses heating and cooling but employs the concrete to store residual energy for later use to trim ...
  • In Meier's footsteps

    24-Feb-2000

    The latest cluster of buildings on the Richard Meier-master-planned Edinburgh Park office development has reached completion.
  • Kate Hoey slams Mather's new South Bank masterplan

    24-Feb-2000

    NEWS
  • Railtrack reveals £1bn office plan

    24-Feb-2000

    NEWS
  • Red Ken beats Dobbo - but only for RIBA's design advice

    24-Feb-2000

    NEWS
  • Belfast embraces design as ship-building dwindles

    16-Feb-2000

    News
  • EPR's Spitalfields body of work

    16-Feb-2000

    epr Architects last week unveiled its second office design for the historic Spitalfields area of London as developers warned of a £500,000 bill for the removal of thousands of medieval corpses found buried on the site.
  • EU set for 'switch building' boom

    16-Feb-2000

    news
  • Manchester announces Piccadilly Gardens five

    16-Feb-2000

    News
  • BDP defends 'indifferent' design against listing threat

    10-Feb-2000

    bdp, architect of a new £30 million sports and teaching building for South Bank University in London, has hit back at conservationists' attempts to block the development.
  • Beeb tunes in to Alsop & Stormer

    10-Feb-2000

    The bbc has signed Alsop & Stormer to its coveted framework agreement of preferred architects.
  • Rogers and Goldschmied rip London planning apart

    10-Feb-2000

    Lord Rogers and riba president Marco Goldschmied have launched a stinging attack on urban planning in London.
  • Software anti-piracy outfit gets heavy with architects

    10-Feb-2000

    Paul Brookes Architects has paid a settlement of around £1000 to an alliance of software companies after being caught using unlicensed software on its network.
  • Treasury opts for prime contracting

    3-Feb-2000

    News
  • UK Athletics bid stumbles at first stadium hurdle

    3-Feb-2000

    News
  • Dixon Jones BDP exonerated over Opera House chaos

    27-Jan-2000

    News
  • Southwark Council threatens to raze social housing

    27-Jan-2000

    The ambitious competition to regenerate the Elephant and Castle area of south London could see the area's social-housing stock being slashed by up to 40 per cent, it emerged this week.
  • Next stop for Thameslink visions: the public

    20-Jan-2000

    A public inquiry into the Thameslink 2000 project involving four station redesigns in central London will open in late spring.
  • Tyne Millennium bridge rises £1 million over budget

    13-Jan-2000

    Underwater complications have sent the Wil-kinson Eyre-designed Millennium bridge in Gateshead £1 million over budget.
  • UK Athletics sets sights on dedicated new stadium

    13-Jan-2000

    News
  • Design Council chooses best of British architecture

    16-Dec-1999

    news
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