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Troubled Glasgow Tower 'could open for Christmas'

The controversial £10 million Glasgow Tower, which has been closed for most of its five-year life, could finally reopen in time for Christmas.

The skyscraper was originally designed by Horden Cherry Lee, but the scheme was taken over by BDP after the project was commissioned.

At 127m high, the tower is the tallest free-standing structure in Scotland, and is the only building in the world that can turn 360° from the ground up.

However, the tower has been plagued by safety and engineering problems throughout its history.

The building, which was completed in 2001, was closed between February 2002 and August 2004 due to problems with the custom-made bearings on which it rotates.

And in January 2005 10 people were trapped in one of the lifts for five hours after it broke down.

Rumours on the local architectural scene say the tower is set to reopen almost immediately, but the owner, the Glasgow Science Centre, is refusing to name a date.

A spokesman for the centre said: 'The tower will be opening in the future, but a date of the opening has not been released yet. Rest assured it will be on our website as soon as it is known.'

by Richard Vaughan

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