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Scottish buildings battle it out for British architecture's biggest cash prize

The shortlist for the biggest financial prize in UK architecture, the RIAS Andrew Doolan Best Building in Scotland Award 2006, has been officially unveiled.

A group of 10 buildings selected from Scotland's finest will be vying to scoop the £25,000 prize money at Edinburgh's Balmoral Hotel on November 16th.

This year saw the highest number of entries since the prize began in 2002, and the shortlisted 10 will each be battling to be judged as the most outstanding building created in Scotland in the last 12 months.

BDP has found three of its buildings in the final 10, making it an early favourite with the bookies.

According to Mary Wrenn, chief executive of the RIAS, the aim of the award is to, 'recognise the one building which the jury agrees stands out as the best building created in Scotland during the eligibility period.

'A shortlisted building must show the potential to endure as 'a fine work of architecture throughout its working life'. The overall Andrew Doolan Award winner should be a clear example of an outstanding work of architecture,' she said.

The panel of judges, which includes Clare Wright of Wright & Wright Architects, and RIAS president Douglas Read, will spend the next 10 days visiting each of the buildings, before making a decision on the night.

The shortlist is:

Maggie's Highland Cancer Centre, Inverness, by Page\Park Architects;

The Scottish Storytelling Centre, Edinburgh, by Malcolm Fraser Architects;

Perth Concert Hall, Perth, by BDP;

St Mary's Metropolitan Cathedral redevelopment, Edinburgh, by LDN Architects;

The Bridge Arts Centre, Easterhouse, Glasgow, by Gareth Hoskins Architects;

JKS Workshops, Clydebank, by Gordon Murray + Alan Dunlop Architects;

The Saltire Centre, Glasgow, by BDP;

Kelvingrove New Century Project, by BDP;

Seton Mains house, Longniddry, by Paterson Architects; and

Royal Bank of Scotland HQ, Gogarburn, Edinburgh, by Michael Laird Architects.

by Richard Vaughan

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