By continuing to use the site you agree to our Privacy & Cookies policy

Your browser seems to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser.

Close

Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Close

Revealed: winner of Royal Docks contest

Landscape architects Bethany Gale and Sarah Tolley have been revealed as the winning team in the contest to reimagine London’s Royal Docks

The proposal by BDP staff member Gale, and Tolley, who works at Levitt Bernstein, transforms the former shipbuilding dock into a marina ‘encouraging sport, leisure and wildlife preservation’.

A ‘green axis’ through the scheme would link Thames Barrier Park through to the Wilkinson Eyre-designed Siemen’s Crystal, the Emirates cable car and the DLR station, improving accessibility to the site.

Speaking about their design, Gale and Tolley said: ‘Silvertown Docks proposes a new type of marina for the Royal Docks that balances the past with the present. Once used as a graving dock for shipbuilding and repair, the site is transformed into a unique series of spaces that encourage both ecological and human uses.’

Commenting on the winning scheme, the judges said: ‘This has a sense of place and a notion of history. It has a seeming effortlessness that comes together into something that is believable. It creates a green oasis in the docks and has elements that will appeal to everybody, humanising the dock and softening its hard edges, making the most of existing assets.’

The pair saw off competition from 20 other shortlisted entries to bag the £2,000 prize money.

Second prize went to Arup’s masterplan for a technology hub surrounding London City airport with new flood defences and large-scale food production.

The judges also awarded four runners-up prizes to Studio Engleback, Baharash Architects and students Christos Diplas and James Hartwell.

Previous story (AJ 03.03.14)

Revealed: shortlist in contest to reimagine London’s Royal Docks

Arup and Gensler among 20-strong shortlist in London Royal Docks ideas competition

The contest, run by the Landscape Institute and Ecobuild, called for ambitious proposals to reimagine London’s Royal Docks.

The proposals, which tackled the issues of surface water flood risk, water pollution, and drought, included rain gardens, floating villages, food production, and new parks.

The shortlist

BD Landscape Architects: Albert Island - an urban park with a productive orchard and boardwalk riverwalk

Albert Island by BD Landscape Architects

Studio Engleback: Biophilia - a floating garden city with ‘Boris pedalos’

Biophilia by Studio Engleback

Arup: E16 6BL - a scheme introducing new flood defences and large scale food production through hydrophonics

E16 6BL by Arup

Bethany Gale and Sarah Tolley: Silvertown Docks - a new mixed-use dock development

Silvertown Docks by Bethany Gale and Sarah Tolley

Shu Kuei Hsu of the University of Washington and Qian Qian Ye of Cornell University: The Resilient Docks - a sustainable development integrating green infrastructure and water sensitive design for future climate change mitigation

The Resilient Docks by Shu Kuei Hsu of the University of Washington and Qian Qian Ye of Cornell University

Konrad Boncza-Pioro: Silvertown Quays and Minoco Wharf - designs to establish a new aquarium as a centre for marine and inland water ecosystem studies

Silvertown Quays and Minoco Wharf by Konrad Boncza-Pioro

Artem Barkhin of Leeds Metropolitan University: Silvertown Green Docks - a new floating village, urban forest and network of wetlands

Silvertown Green Docks by Artem Barkhin of Leeds Metropolitan University

Andreas Boden and Malan Í Jákupsstovu: Silvertown Wetlands - a green nature retreat and walkway acting as a wetland flood plain

Silvertown Wetlands by Andreas Boden and Malan Í Jákupsstovu

Baharash Architecture: Water Boulevards - a network of ‘water boulevards’ to transform the Royal Docks into a series of floating villages

Water Boulevards by Baharash Architecture

Gensler: A Landmark for Living - a new park, bridges and transport links to improve connectivity within the Royal Docks

A Landmark for Living by Gensler

James Hartwell at the University of Sheffield: Re-Connecting the Docks - a new bridge to connect the proposed London City Island and Trinity Buoy Wharf with Victoria Dock

Re-Connecting the Docks by James Hartwell at the University of Sheffield

The Ecology Consultancy, The Green Roof Company, Charlotte Harris Landscape Design and Marianna Magklara Architecture and Environmental Engineering: The Ecosystems Engines - clusters of island pods and pontoons, including a wet woodland, flower rich habitats and grey water harvesting

The Ecosystem Engines by The Ecology Consultancy, The Green Roof Company, Charlotte Harris Landscape Design and Marianna Magklara Architecture and Environmental Engineering

Floating Forest by Greysmith Associates - a proposal for a floating forest

Floating Forest by Greysmith Associates

GAAM Architectes: Fade-In Landscape - a greenway stretching the length of the docks

Fade-In Landscape by GAAM Architectes

Metrostudio UK: 3 Systems - a new canal side living and a riverside park

3 Systems by Metrostudio UK

Christos Diplas at the University of Sheffield: Narcissus - a series of reflective greenhouses to provide energy for lighting and heating

Narcissus by Christos Diplas at the University of Sheffield

Kay Pallaris, Jamie Abbott, Francesco Bernabei, Nick Udal, Briony Turner, Mena Shah, Francesca Guarascio and Luis Rojas: The Sensory Docks - a masterplan which uses the five senses to connect with local surroundings

The Sensory Docks by Kay Pallaris, Jamie Abbott, Francesco Bernabei, Nick Udal, Briony Turner, Mena Shah, Francesca Guarascio and Luis Rojas

Carl Hong, Farah Dakkak and Brad Clothier: Life in Technicolour - a floating village, public square, wetlands, beach and rain gardens

Life in Technicolour by Carl Hong, Farah Dakkak and Brad Clothier

Jonathan Dancey at the University of Gloucestershire: Project Float - a floating development based on a modular design with infinite uses and layouts

Project Float, by Jonathan Dancey at the University of Gloucestershire

HWP Planungsgesellschaft mbH: What if We Move the River? - a plan which imagines the redirection of the Thames to unlock land to form a new River Thames Park

What if We Move the River? by HWP Planungsgesellschaft mbH

Commenting on the shortlist, Sue Illman, president of the Landscape Institute, said: ‘It’s time we started to see water as a valuable resource – rather than something to be hidden away underground. Recent events in Somerset and elsewhere in the country have demonstrated that the UK desperately needs a fully integrated approach to flooding, water supply and land use management. The designs on the shortlist show what is possible if we adopt a mixed green, grey and blue infrastructure approach. I hope this competition helps stimulate debate about how we should be planning and managing more “liveable” and water-sensitive places in the future.’

Competition judge and Open-City founder Victoria Thornton, added: ‘The thought-provoking green designs demonstrate how neglected areas generally, as well as the Royal Docks, can be transformed into vibrant and liveable environments.’

The twenty-strong shortlist was chosen from more than 65 entries.

A winner will be announced at Ecobuild later this week.

 

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment.

Related Jobs

Sign in to see the latest jobs relevant to you!

The searchable digital buildings archive with drawings from more than 1,500 projects

AJ newsletters