By continuing to use the site you agree to our Privacy & Cookies policy

Rescued: HLM snaps up collapsed Llewelyn Davies

HLM has snapped up the remnants of Llewelyn Davies Yeang (LDY), the 53-year-old practice which last month announced its surprise closure

The new practice will trade as Llewelyn Davies and be run independently of HLM. The Camden-based health and aviation specialists had a workforce of about 35 before it went into liquidation in April. The new studio will have a ‘slimmed down’ team of just 16.

Former director of LDY, Malaysian eco-star Ken Yeang who independently set up Llewelyn Davies Ken Yeang last month, will have no links to the resurrected outfit.

The board of the new Llewelyn Davies will comprise HLM directors Caroline Buckingham and John Clarke along with Steve Featherstone and Bert McCabe, who were ex-directors at LDY.

Acording to HLM, the team will continue to focus on ‘masterplanning, healthcare, social infrastructure and transport’. Key projects include the ongoing works at Great Ormond Street Hospital, which is soon to go out to tender for its construction phase; the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital masterplan; and several projects for University College London Hospital Charity.

Featherstone said: ‘Having collaborated on a number of projects and bids, we are delighted to be working with HLM. The brand of ‘Llewelyn Davies’ has a heritage and reputation which is recognised worldwide. 

‘With HLM’s sound and successful business practices to support the new business, we look forward to assisting existing and future clients to deliver social infrastructure with innovative, commercial and sustainable designs.’

Buckingham added: ‘The last five years have been challenging for our profession and the wider building industry. We are pleased to be in a position to ensure a great brand like Llewelyn Davies is sustained so it can continue to provide its specialised expertise to clients.

‘This new venture allows HLM to reinforce and strengthen its healthcare design capability in London and the South East as well as internationally.  There will be great career opportunities for staff.’

In May 2005 Llewelyn Davies, which was the 13th largest in the practice in the country employing about 140 people, made a surprise move to link up with Malaysian eco-superstar Ken Yeang.

The tie-up was billed as a ‘mutually beneficial relationship’ that would give Yeang ‘a foothold in the First World’, but the expected raft of work and queue of clients for Yeang’s much-vaunted green skyscrapers failed to materialise.  

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment.

Related Jobs

Sign in to see the latest jobs relevant to you!

The searchable digital buildings archive with drawings from more than 1,500 projects

AJ newsletters