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Details emerge of killer architect's professional life

Details of the professional life of millionaire architect Michael Morton, convicted of killing his estranged wife, have begun to emerge.

Morton - who was jailed for seven years yesterday after being found guilty of manslaughter at the Old Bailey - was employed at the GLC 'general division' until close to his retirement in 1994, when his name disappears from the ARB register of architects.

The register lists his place of residence in W11, right in the middle of London's trendy Notting Hill, the area in which police have speculated his wife's remains could still be concealed.

Morton was public school educated and studied mathematics at Cambridge University, eventually turning to architecture and qualifying in 1975, at the age of 37.

He worked mainly for the GLC but also on his own projects, including a house for his mother in Spain. Morton is thought to have inherited much of his fortune from his parents.

The jury found Morton, 67, guilty of the manslaughter of Argentinean ex-violinist Gracia Morton, 40, who went missing eight years ago and whose body has never been found.

The court heard that officers who have worked on case believe Morton may have used his knowledge of the building trade to dispose of her corpse.

The court also heard that Morton was rumbled after he reported his wife missing. CCTV pictures discovered six years later showed him using keys to enter his wife's new home, even though friends had described her as 'obsessive' about not telling him where she lived.

Gracia Morton was last seen alive on November 12, 1997 - three weeks before she was due to divorce her husband.

by Rob Sharp

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