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Winner of 3DReid student prize revealed

The winner of UK’s largest student competition, run by 3DReid, has been revealed

Part II student Alan Keane of the University of Dundee took the top prize of £1,500. Competition judge and 3DReid chairman, Charles Graham-Marr, described Keane’s theatre scheme as ‘extremely sophisticated, extremely powerful and unfettered by fashion or tradition.’

WINNER: Alan Keane, University of Dundee

WINNER: Alan Keane, University of Dundee

The winners of the £100 online vote prize were Mark Sneddon & Stuart Russell of the University of Strathclyde. Judge Alan Hooper said their scheme, called The Desire to Make, was ‘engaging with the world’ and showed ‘understanding of the move between academia and the profession.’

All student finalists were awarded a £100 book voucher. The annual competition is open to part II students.

The competition was judged by Charles Graham-Marr; Paul Warner, research director at 3DReid; Alan Hooper; John Shepherd and AJ news editor Richard Waite.

 

Previous story (06.07.10)

Finalists unveiled in UK’s largest student prize

The finalists have been named in this year’s 3DReid Student Prize - the UK’s largest student award worth £1,500 to the winner

The six-strong shortlist includes the winners of the online vote - the end of year project by Mark Sneddon and Stuart Russell of the University of Strathclyde - and the proposals by Part II University of Bath student Nick Shurey which was selected by visitors to the practice’s in-office exhibition for the London Festival of Architecture.

The remaining finalist were chosen by an internal jury.

Full shortlist:

  • The Desire to Make by Mark Sneddon & Stuart Russell of the University of Strathclyde - online winner
  • Adam’s Cidery by Graeme Winestone of Liverpool John Moores University
  • Theatre by Alan Keane of University of Dundee
  • Monastere de L’Eau de Vie by Nick Shurey, University of Bath - LFA winner
  • An Opening into Voids by Will Laslett of University of Westminster
  • Landscapes of Memory by Helen Goodwin, Kingston University School of Architecture

David Stanford, chair of the judging panel at 3DReid said: ‘The standard again this year was exceptionally high and the style of work submitted was extremely diverse. It is tough every year to whittle the entries down and this year was no different. Several other candidates came within a whisker of making the final six.’

The overall winner and online public vote winner will be announced at the end of the month.

Previous story (23.06.10)

Finalists unveiled in UK’s largest student prize

Voting has opened for this year’s 3DReid Student Prize - the UK’s largest student award worth £1,500 to the winner

The online victor will join the student most voted for at the exhibition, currently on show at the company’s offices as part of the London Festival of Architecture, on the final shortlist.

The remaining finalists will be selected by an internal panel. A record-equalling 22 schools of architecture nominated their best Part II students for the coveted prize which is again backed by the AJ.

To vote online click here. The exhibition in the foyer of the practice’s London headquarters at West End House, 11 Hills Place, is open to the public during office hours.

 
Voting stays open until Friday 2nd July and the lucky shortlisted student will be announced the following week.

Previous winners include Gavin Lowden of University of Northumbria (2009 - pictured below), Ross Perkin from the University of Edinburgh (2008) and ex-Bartlett Student Sara Shafiei (2007)

2009 winner: Gavin Lowden's end of year project

2009 winner: Gavin Lowden’s end of year project

Readers' comments (2)

  • *cough* Matthew MacKinnon, Edinburgh College of Art *cough* Stevel Holl, Sarphatistraat Offices *cough*

    http://www.stevenholl.com/media/files/155/155BE01PW---W-PROJECT-HORIZ.jpg

    Unsuitable or offensive?

  • Hmmm, I hadn't seen that Steven Holl building, but there are quite a few similarities now you mention it!

    Having shown it to a non-architecture person, they were convinced that they were images of the same building from different angles! Having said that it is a good visual.

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