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Terry Farrell named decade's greatest contributor to London planning

Veteran architect Terry Farrell has been recognized by London mayor’s for having the biggest impact on planning and development over the past ten years

The 74-year-old mayoral advisor beat a string of major developers including former Land Securities chief Francis Salway and Canary Wharf Group boss George Iacobescu to win the coveted title.

Argent’s Roger Madelin was also commended for the redevelopment of King’s Cross which London mayor Boris Johnson attributed to the ‘martini principle’.

‘Roger will meet anyone, anywhere, anytime,’ Mayor Johnson said at the London Planning Awards ceremony last night (1 February) in City Hall.

The ‘dramatic’ London 2012 Olympic Park bagged the evening’s top prize - the Mayor’s award for planning excellence.

Johnson praised the 64-hectare project’s ‘spectacular showcasing of world-class planning, design and engineering skills’ but jokingly admitted before announcing the win: ‘This is the first time I’ve looked at shortlist for my own award’.

John McAslan and Partner’s ‘audacious and awe-inspiring’ £547 million overhaul of Grade I-listed King’s Cross station was named London’s best built project.

Within the ‘community scale’ category for smaller projects, Pollard Thomas Edwards’ Tidemill Academy and Deptford Lounge was named overall winner. Johnson described it as the ‘jewel in the crown of Deptford’s regeneration’.

The 6,800-home Olympic Legacy masterplan was named best conceptual project.

‘I don’t know why we call these conceptual projects,’ quipped the mayor. ‘Half of them are going to happen. Actually all of them are going to happen, in the next three years at least.’

BD’s revamp of Ladywell Fields in Lewisham won the best new public space prize while Levitt Bernstein’s regeneration of the Aylesbury Estate in Southwark was crowned best new place to live.

A second award went to McAslan for its Roundhouse regeneration project in Camden. The historic rock music venue was named London’s best built project five years on.

The historic building management prize went to Dixon Jones’ Quadrant 3 redevelopment for the Crown Estate on Regent’s Street and the best town centre project award went to the ‘exemplary and inspirational’ transformation of Leyton in east London.

Johnson, said: ‘Yet again the standard of entries this year is excellent. From town centres to public buildings and new green spaces, the variety and quality of the submitted projects gives me great confidence and excitement about the fantastic transformations we are seeing in every corner of this great city.

‘This year I am particularly delighted to be able to recognise the exceptional work of Sir Terry Farrell who has made an incredible contribution to London’s public realm which is enjoyed by Londoners and visitors from around the world.’

Jo Valentine, chief executive of London First, said: ‘The London Planning Awards celebrate the best of what can be achieved in the capital. They demonstrate what is possible when we work together to create great buildings, places and neighbourhoods.

‘This year’s winners and all nominees are outstanding and their projects will help strengthen London’s position as the best city in the world. The planning and development of Olympic Park is an outstanding symbol of London’s ability to host major events and the major regeneration of East London.’

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