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Shanghai hotel scoops top prize at INSIDE: World Festival of Interiors awards

Neri&Hu has been crowned overall winner of the INSIDE: World Festival of Interiors awards

The Shanghai-based architect’s 19-room boutique hotel project was named World Interior of the Year at the inaugural event in Barcelona last week.

The project transformed a 1930s Japanese army building and created new Cor-Ten steel additions to the building.

Judge Ilse Crawford said it was a ‘tough call’ between Neri&Hu’s scheme and the Ceramics Study Galleries at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London by Opera Amsterdam.

The overall winner was chosen from the nine category winners.

A total of 44 shortlisted schemes took part in the competitive pitching process for the individual category awards.

Competition judges included Jaime Hayon, Andre Fu, Paul Priestman and Ilse Crawford.

 

The INSIDE: World Festival of Interiors winners were:

 

Hotels category winner: The Waterhouse at South Bund, Shanghai by Neri&Hu, China

Hotels category winner: The Waterhouse at South Bund, Shanghai by Neri Hu, China

Hotels category winner: The Waterhouse at South Bund, Shanghai by Neri Hu, China

Waterhouse is a four-storey, 19-room boutique hotel in a three-storey Japanese Army headquarters building dating from the 1930´s. the architectural expression articulates the contrast of what is old and new, with additions, built over the existing structure in Cor-Ten steel. The interiors blue and invert notions of inside and out, public and private. This notion of public and private space is inspired by the essence of traditional lane houses. The designers pride themselves on having ‘a good understanding of how to preserve historical buildings in the proper way.’ A rare vision in China.

Judges citation: ‘This project showed daring and provocative vision executed in incredible detail.’ 

 

Office category winner: Barcode Office, Singapore by Ministry of Design, Singapore

Office category winner: Barcode Office, Singapore by Ministry of Design, Singapore

Office category winner: Barcode Office, Singapore by Ministry of Design, Singapore

Inhabiting six converted shop-house units, Ministry of Design’s studio accommodates the entire office on a single floor. Encouraging innovation and creativity, space was designed without hierarchy or barriers. A series of mixed areas are positioned along ´catwalks´ including a gallery, meeting space, open-plan desks, hot-desk discussion zones and a library.

Judges citation: ‘This scheme delivered a big impact on how people work in the space.’

 

Bar & Restaurant category winner: Table No.1, Shanghai by Neri&Hu, China

Bar and Restaurant category winner: Table No.1, Shanghai by Neri Hu, China

Bar and Restaurant category winner: Table No.1, Shanghai by Neri Hu, China

In Shanghai´s South Bund District, Table No.1 occupies the ground floor of a 19-room boutique hotel. Blurring the boundary between public and private, a dining area sits between courtyard and sidewalk, offering views up into the hotel´s private realm. Custom-designed furniture includes long wooden tables made from wood recycled from the existing roof.

 

Culture & Civic category winner: Football Training Centre, Soweto by RUF Project, Canada

Culture and Civic category winner: Football Training Centre, Soweto by RUF Project, Canada

Culture and Civic category winner: Football Training Centre, Soweto by RUF Project, Canada

As an important community project, openness and transparency were key consideration in the design of Soweto’s new Football Training Centre. This resulted in innovative responses to safety and security, including an artist designed chain link fence that surrounds the site. Elsewhere a limited palette of raw materials - concrete, stone, timber and steel, creates a sense of warmth. The project was described by designer and creative director of RUF Project Sean Pearson as ‘and intense but fun and worthwhile project.’

Judges citation: ‘This project is powerful gesture for an impoverished community, communicating a proud sense of Soweto as a special place. The scheme displays a sensible, malleable and interesting interior, done in an amazingly short period. Highly sustainable with re-used materials the magic the project displays a remarkable transformation of sketches into symbols.’

 

Retail category winner: Hosted, London by James Plumb, United Kingdom

Retail category winner: Hosted, London by James Plumb, United Kingdom

Retail category winner: Hosted, London by James Plumb, United Kingdom

The aesthetic of this menswear store uses antique and reclaimed pieces to create a sense of charm and timelessness. With two rooms - one a warm and light hue, the other a darker and more enveloping - distressed artworks decorate walls, vintage lampshades create a chandelier and clothes are displayed on hand-cast concrete plinths. Designers Hannah Plumb and James Russell both have backgrounds in fine art and sculpture, which can clearly be seen in the handmade detailing.

Judges citation: ‘This project struck us with its nature, simplicity and honesty - great attention to detail.’

 

Residential category winner: Strelein Warehouse, Sydney by Ian Moore Architects, Australia

Residential category winner: Strelein Warehouse, Sydney by Ian Moore Architects, Australia

Residential category winner: Strelein Warehouse, Sydney by Ian Moore Architects, Australia

This nineteenth-century warehouse is now a one-bedroom residence. With two street frontages at different levels, a new front door is located in the former loading dock. Internally the level change creates a dynamic relationship between double height living room and elevated kitchen. Existing elements have been painted white, with new elements painted black. “Everything existing was to remain white and everything added to the space was to be black,” said Ian Moore of his striking scheme.

 

Transport category winner: Wellington International Airport (The Rock), Wellington by Studio Pacific & Warren and Mahoney in Association, New Zealand

Transport category winner: Wellington International Airport (The Rock), Wellington by Studio Pacific with Warren and Mahoney in Association, New Zealand

Transport category winner: Wellington International Airport (The Rock), Wellington by Studio Pacific with Warren and Mahoney in Association, New Zealand

The extension of Wellington Airport had two overarching requirements: to provide a memorable experience and to have an edgy design. Inside space unfolds on numerous levels, encouraging and enabling exploration. Deep window seats offer very specific vantage points, providing a significant alternative to the large areas experienced in the existing main terminal building. ‘The brief was to divide opinion by the design’ said Studio Pacific’s Nick Barratt-Boyes.

Judges citation: ‘We were impressed that the project celebrated the local heritage through symbolic design that didn’t adhere to the stereotype of a typical transport building.’

 

Display category winner: Ceramics Study Galleries Victoria & Albert Museum, London by Opera Amsterdam, Netherlands

Display category winner: Ceramics Study Galleries Victoria and Albert Museum, London by Opera Amsterdam, Netherlands

Display category winner: Ceramics Study Galleries Victoria and Albert Museum, London by Opera Amsterdam, Netherlands

Out of public view since 2004, the V&A’s London Collection is back on display, featuring more than 26, 000 ceramics. Senior Designer Jeroen Luttikhuis of Opera Amsterdam asserted that the project was ‘all about density and multitude’. The collection is set in four vitrines, two circular and two elongated, that measure up to 30 metres long and more than 3.5 metres high. Standing free in the space, they are distinguished by their simplicity.

Judges citation: ‘With this category we were trying to find one strong idea behind the design – the ability to limit the confusion of too many ideas. This project presented one strong idea and was executed really well - from the materials to its function and lighting.’

 

Creative Re-Use category winner: St Barbara Bastion, Valletta by Architecture Project, Malta

Creative Re-Use category winner: St Barbara Bastion, Valletta by Architecture Project, Malta

Creative Re-Use category winner: St Barbara Bastion, Valletta by Architecture Project, Malta

The conversion of this three-storey house into offices and residential space, exploits the double-helix principle in the design of a new stair that twists and warps to resolve the existing building’s irregular floor levels. The threshold between new and old is further articulated by benches, peep holes and shelving. The project designer said, ‘if you know Malta, you will know that it is difficult not to touch history’, with a lot of their projects being restoration and adaptive re-use schemes.

Judges citation: ‘This project was a strong scheme where the winner pushed boundaries to the limit.’

 

 

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