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Rural Design bags brace of Saltire awards

Skye-based Rural Design is celebrating after winning two accolades at the Saltire Housing Design Awards ceremony earlier today

As well as landing an award in the new build, private dwelling category for its timber holiday home in Fiscavaig, the practice also scooped the Saltire Society’s inaugural Saltire Medal - worth £1,500.

The accolade, which was judged by John McAslan, was introduced as part of a raft of changes to this year’s scheme which witnessed a surge in entries.

Colin Andrew Smith Architect’s ‘spectacularly situated’ Rock House in Perthshire picked up an award in the same category as Fiscavaig and there were also prizes for Elder and Cannon Architects’ Queens Gate scheme, Clydebank in the large scale housing development category.

McAslan said: ‘The Medal winner, Fiscavaig, stood out for its innovative use of materials and design which took account of its surroundings and setting.

‘The standard of architecture being produced in Scotland is extraordinary and Fiscavaig is a perfect example.’

 

Large Scale Housing Development:

Winner:
Queens Gate, Clydebank by Elder and Cannon Architects

Commendations:
Inglis Point, Edinburgh by Oberlanders Architects
Wauchope Square Phase Two by Elder and Cannon Architects
Ravelston Terrace, Edinburgh by Allan Murray Architects

Private Dwelling – New Build:

Winners:
Rock House, Kenmore by Colin Andrew Smith Architect
15 Fiscavaig, Isle of Skye by Rural Design

Commendations:
Bookend Cottage, Tobermory by Roxburgh McEwan Architects  

Renovations Alterations and Extensions: 

Winners:
Clocktower, Dundee by Archial Architects
Sutherland Avenue, Pollocksheilds by Studio KAP Architects
Auchoish Steading, Lochgilphead by Studio KAP Architects

Commendations:
Russell Place, Edinburgh by Arcade Architects
Circus Lane, Edinburgh by WT Architects   

Factfile:

The Saltire Society was established in 1936 ‘to encourage everything that might improve the quality of life in Scotland’. Its name is taken from the flag of Scotland, which has the form of a saltire

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