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Rogers' Lloyd's becomes youngest Grade-I listed building

Richard Rogers’ iconic Lloyd’s building in central London has been given the highest listing status just weeks after its 25th birthday

This morning (19 December) architecture minister John Penrose handed a Grade I listing to the 1986 seminal, high-tech office block for insurance firm Lloyd’s.

The building became eligible for listing this year - 30 years on from the start of construction work. In January 2008 The Twentieth Century Society urged English Heritage (EH) to ‘urgently’ spot-list the landmark.

At the time EH refused saying it would not recommend it for listing until the statutory 30 years had elapsed.

‘It is universally recognised as one of the key buildings of the modern epoch’

English Heritage’s designation director Roger Bowdler, who had put forward the building for listing, said: ‘We’re delighted that the minister has endorsed our advice to list the landmark Lloyd’s building at Grade l.’

He added: ‘The Lloyd’s building designed by the Richard Rogers Partnership stands the test of time with its awe-inspiring futuristic design which exemplifies the High Tech style in Britain. It clearly merits the extra protection against unsuitable alteration or development that listing provides.

‘Its listing at the highest grade is fitting recognition of the sheer splendour of Richard Rogers’ heroic design. Its dramatic scale and visual dazzle, housing a hyper-efficient commercial complex, is universally recognised as one of the key buildings of the modern epoch.’

The Lloyd’s Building will joins a select group of Modern Grade I-listed buildings – among them the Royal Festival Hall and Norman Foster’s Willis Building in Ipswich.

The Rogers reaction

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners is delighted that Lloyd’s of London is to be honoured with Grade I Listing status. It is important to conserve buildings of architectural and historical significance and the work of English Heritage is central to that.

It is also of vital importance for buildings to remain flexible spaces which meet the changing needs of those who live or work in them.

English Heritage have recognised this, ensuring the spirit of the original design is retained while the building remains adaptable in the future

AJ Buildings Library

 

See 36 photographs, 16 drawings and project data for the Lloyd’s Building in the AJ Buildings Library

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