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Plans to rescue Liverpool's collapsed Baltic Triangle revealed

Neptune Developments and architects Falconer Chester Hall (FCH) have finally unveiled their plans to resurrect the mothballed Baltic Triangle site in Liverpool

Work on the £1 billion scheme (pictured below) came to a halt in April 2007 when London-based Windsor Developments went into administration - a high-profile financial collapse which contributed to the demise of original project architects Downs Variava in early 2008.

Then in January 2010 it emerged that Neptune had taken over the scheme, teaming up with Windsor’s administrators, BDO Stoy Hayward, to develop the site opposite King’s Waterfront.

Now, two years later, the development team looks set to submit plans for 201 apartments, a 170-bed hotel, and nearly 500m² of mixed commercial space for the abandoned plot close to the Liverpool One retail area.

The £45 million scheme will feature four buildings and a 330-space, underground car park.

Steve Parry, Neptune Developments’ managing director, said: ‘This is a key site in the heart of Liverpool and its proximity to the Liverpool Echo Arena and Conference Centre, Liverpool One, and of course our Mann Island scheme, make it a very attractive proposition.

‘We are working closely with the city council and with local residents to ensure that our proposals are absolutely right for the area and we look forward to turning what is currently an eyesore into the final piece of the jigsaw for this vibrant area of Liverpool.’

Subject to the planning the scheme could start on site this summer (2012).

Downs Variava's doomed Baltic Triangle scheme

Downs Variava’s doomed Baltic Triangle scheme

Previous story (AJ 05.01.10)

New design team to rescue Liverpool’s collapsed Baltic Triangle scheme

Neptune Developments and architects Falconer Chester Hall are to take on the mothballed Baltic Triangle site in Liverpool

Work on the £1 billion scheme (pictured) came to a halt in April 2007 when London-based Windsor Developments went into administration - a high-profile financial collapse which contributed to the demise of original project architects Downs Variava in early 2008. The Manchester-based practice was owed more than £500,000 when Windsor went under.

Now Neptune will work in partnership with Windsor’s administrators, BDO Stoy Hayward, to develop the site which is opposite King’s Waterfront and close to the Liverpool One retail area.

While the original Windsor Development scheme was largely residential, it is understood that any new proposals are likely to be mixed-use.

Neptune Developments managing director Steve Parry said: ‘I am delighted that we will be working with the administrator to develop proposals for this strategically important site. 

‘It’s crucially important that this site does not continue to blight confidence or further investment in this area and that is why we will be working hard to bring forward an appropriate and deliverable development mix as soon as is reasonably possible.’

Alastair Shepherd from Falconer Chester Hall added: ‘Liverpool One and the development of Kings’ Dock have brought the site closer to the heart of Liverpool city centre. We will be looking to bring forward a design that supports the ongoing transformation of the Baltic area and is an attractive addition to the waterfront skyline.’

Readers' comments (1)

  • What an awful scheme. The architects obviously have been given a brief to cram as many on to the site, adjacent to a Grade II listed building as they can.
    Neptune of coures are the developer behind the "Three Black Coffins" on Mann Island that have ruined the World Heritage Site.

    ‘We are working closely with the city council and with local residents to ensure that our proposals are absolutely right for the area and we look forward to turning what is currently an eyesore into the final piece of the jigsaw for this vibrant area of Liverpool.’

    Do you believe them, I dont.

    Unsuitable or offensive?

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