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Pitman Tozer unwraps Notting Hill terrace revamp

[FIRST LOOK + PLANS + DATA] Manser Medal-winning practice Pitman Tozer has completed this remodelling and extension of a 1850s home in Notting Hill, west London

The 310m² Lateral House scheme, which has been shortlisted for this year’s AJ Retrofit Awards, ‘stitches’ a three-storey extension onto the existing terrace and includes a new timber-clad annex sat within the rear garden.

The home’s original central internal stair was replaced with a new stair set to one side. A modern ‘outrigger extension’ was added at the rear to create larger floor plates.

The winners of the AJ Retrofit Awards will be announced at an awards ceremony on 11 September, at The Brewery in London. Book tickets, here.

The architect’s view

The original property has been stripped to its core and remodeled to create more generous floor plates suited to contemporary living. The design carefully stitches a contemporary three-storey extension on to the existing building and reorientates the property so that the occupants can enjoy the Southerly aspect of the house.

A striking new timber clad annex in the rear garden enjoys independent access from the adjoining mews and provides surplus accommodation. The interplay between the house and the annex across the garden is an essential component of the scheme, shifting the focus to the house’s relationship to its south-facing garden.

The original house, a semi-detached villa dating from the 1850s, was extended to the side and an additional floor was added in the 1970s. Pitman Tozer replaced the original central internal stair with a new stair to the side, and added a modern outrigger extension to the garden elevation to create more generous floor plates.

On the lower level and ground floor this provides open plan living accommodation while on the upper floors this enables flexible arrangements for bedrooms and bathrooms.

The new extension is distinct from the original building through the use of flush glazing and contemporary openings. The creation of terraces at different floors and on the roof level allows the family to enjoy a variety of different external spaces relating to the house and annex.

At lower ground floor level the house extends into the garden to provide an open plan family living space with floor to ceiling glazing. The roof of this extension forms a terrace from the ground floor reception room, with stairs giving access to the garden. The large glazed sliding doors to the lower ground floor and to the annex create a shared language, which forms a strong relationship between the two spaces across the stepped terraces of the garden.

The new annex provides a flexible space for the family and can be used as a gym, home office or studio. Clad in dark slatted timber that contrasts and complements the brickwork, the annex has been designed to extend the architectural language so there is a playful correlation between these distinct elements across the garden.

PTA_Lateral_House_Nick_Kane_16

Project Data

Location Notting Hill, London, UK
Gross internal area 310m²
Client Private
Architect Pitman Tozer
Design team Luke Tozer, Tim Pitman, Jonathan Crossley, Simon Graham, Chris Browne
Project architect Jonathan Crossley
Building contractor J&Z Construction
Structural engineer Elliott Wood Partnership
Services engineer Thurgood Design
Quantity surveyor Andrew Ohl Associates
Landscape designer Emma Griffin Garden Design
Arboriculturalist Simon Pryce Arboriculture
Acoustics consultant DKN Acoustics
Audio and audiovisual consultant Crossover

 

Readers' comments (3)

  • very nice indeed.

    Unsuitable or offensive?

  • No ground floor plan and no costs. Dreadful lack of storage throughout especially first floor bedrooms which are really minimal and beds against the wall are far from ideal. The ensuite at first floor should have had a pocket door, the outward opening door is both impractical and potentially dangerous. Visually it looks good but I'm not sure it will prove a practical place to live.

    Unsuitable or offensive?

  • No ground floor plan and no costs. Dreadful lack of storage throughout especially first floor bedrooms which are really minimal and beds against the wall are far from ideal. The ensuite at first floor should have had a pocket door, the outward opening door is both impractical and potentially dangerous. Visually it looks good but I'm not sure it will prove a practical place to live.

    Unsuitable or offensive?

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