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More 60s listings as Vaizey goes post-war crazy

A home designed by Richard and Su Rogers has been listed at Grade II* while HPKA’s Cambridge Graduate Centre has also landed Grade II protection

Architecture minister Ed Vaizey has continued to impress fans of post-war British architecture with his decision to award statutory protection to the two sixties icons.

Richard Rogers’ 1968 single-storey home for his parents in Wimbledon was recognised as the best example of the starchitects’ work and an influence on the ground breaking Pompidou Centre.

The architecture minister described the 22 Parkside building – which was designed by Rogers and his then wife Su – as a ‘masterpiece’ and ‘outstanding and innovative example of a high-tech steel frame house’.

Rogers said: ‘The approach used to design this building inspired much of my future work, including the Centre Pompidou, designed with Renzo Piano, and Lloyd’s of London, which has now been Grade I listed.

‘The house is made up of prefabricated components, principally steel and glass, which can be adapted to changing requirements. Today, my son Ab Rogers and his family live and work in the house and have adapted it to suit their needs.’

Another house by Richard and Su Rogers for photographer Humphrey Spender in Maldon, Essex was recently awarded grade II listing.

Howell, Killick, Partridge and Amis’ 1967 Cambridge Graduate Centre has meanwhile been recognized for its architectural interest.

Featuring a concrete frame and bolted Portland stone cladding, the structure was praised for its ‘thoughtful, compact plan’ and described as an important example of the New Brutalist aesthetic in a sensitive historic location.

Vaizey caused ripples shortly after his appointment by listing n Scott Brownrigg and Turner’s 1965 Yvonne Arnaud Theatre in Guildford at grade II.

More recent listings have included Cold War missile sites at RAF North Luffenham and RAF Harrington.

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