By continuing to use the site you agree to our Privacy & Cookies policy

Miralles' widow demands end to 'stupid' Holyrood changes

Benedetta Tagliabue has vowed to protect Scotland’s Stirling Prize-winning parliament building from further modifications

Miralles’ widow made the remarks as work on Lee Boyd’s controversial £6.5 million security screening extension to EMBT and RMJM-designed building nears completion.

Speaking to the AJ ahead of a symposium today in Scotland celebrating the late Catalan architects’ career Tagliabue said she would continue to fight changes to the iconic building.

She said: ‘Today someone has an idea about security and tomorrow there will be another idea, will they keep changing the building over time and do it forever?

‘This is a very stupid criteria. I would like this to stop and the client to be aware they have a designed building they should be proud about.’

The EMBT principal added the foundation set up two years ago to honour Miralles would rally architects to campaign against further interventions. branding the latest bolt-on ‘really cheap’.

Commenting on the almost complete security extension, she said: ‘I have the impression they are just going to imitate our kind of style, which is the worst [approach] I can imagine. It closes an area between public and private space which is very important.

‘I don’t think they understand what this space did in giving the public the impression of the building being open.’

Tagliabue – who competed in a scrapped open contest for the extension job three years ago – suggested the practice should have been invited to given artistic supervision over the project.

The symposium starts at 6.45pm at the University of Strathclyde School of Architecture Building at 131 Rottenrow, Glasgow, G4 0NG. Speakers include Tagliabue, Strathclyde’s David Charles Reat and Neil Baxter of RIAS.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment.

Related Jobs

Sign in to see the latest jobs relevant to you!

The searchable digital buildings archive with drawings from more than 1,500 projects

AJ newsletters