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McAslan unwraps King’s Cross station concourse

John McAslan and Partners’ dome-roofed concourse for King’s Cross station in London will open to passengers this weekend

The £547 million revamp triples the size of Lewis Cubitt’s Grade I-listed masterpiece and includes a Stanton Williams-designed public square which opens next year.

Designed to serve more than 55 million passengers a year, the shell-shaped glass and steel building provides three times the space of the current station concourse with more shops, better facilities and new underground connections.

The 52 metre-span diagrid roof structure is 15 per cent glazed and is supported by 16 tree columns and one central ‘funnel’ column.

An existing 1970s building on Euston Road will be demolished to make way for the new square.

Ian Fry, Network Rail’s programme director for the new station, said: ‘It’s just a few days to go before we usher in a new era for King’s Cross and everything is on track and looking good.

‘I’m sure that regular users of the current station will be very pleased with the new concourse when it opens, but I’d encourage everyone to pick up one of the station maps we’re giving out this week and take a moment to consider their best route through their new station.’

The structural engineer was Arup.

See timelapse footage of the roof’s construction here.

Readers' comments (5)

  • and the structural engineer was...?

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  • Jonathan ... have a look on The Structural Engineers Journal website, it might say on there.

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  • Joking aside, it is a stunning structure, and a worthy addition to the London Railway Architecture and Engineering compendium - i can't help being slightly dissapointed that it intereferes with the view of the Cubitt building though, and image 2 makes it look like the funnel is on a key pedestrian desire line.

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  • Arup did the structure

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  • The southern view from 1989 shows how the existing hall was intended to sit low and flat so as avoid detracting from the original arches. The recent platform extension to St Pancras next door follows a similar approach, with a flat roof below the level of the main arch. They both failed in their effort to respect the original structure. Hopefully in time St Pancras will be similarly improved.

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