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Ireland's first skyscraper saved from demolition

Ireland’s planning appeal board has saved the country’s first skyscraper – Liberty Hall in Dublin – after refusing permission for a 22-storey replacement scheme by Gilroy McMahon Architects

Project backer, the trade union SIPTU which was to take up half the space in the 100m-tall tower, said it was ‘extremely disappointed’ by An Bord Pleanála’s decision to overturn an earlier approval by Dublin City Council (see AJ 20.03.2012).

The plans for trade union SIPTU would have seen the iconic 17-storey Desmond Ri O’Kelly-designed 1965 tower demolished to make way for the office-led scheme.

SIPTU’s general secretary, Joe O’Flynn said: ‘The union, our architects and professional advisors have put five years hard work into this project including an enormous amount of consultation with Dublin City Council, our members and other key stakeholders including the local community and their public representatives.

We have put five years hard work into this project including an enormous amount of consultation

‘Given that the City Council saw fit earlier this year to grant us planning permission for the redevelopment of Liberty Hall we are extremely disappointed that this decision has now been overturned by An Bord Pleanála. ‘

O’Flynn added that the union and its legal team would be ‘studying the detail of An Bord Pleanála’s decision and the Inspector’s report carefully over the coming days’ but would not would not say whether it planned to take any action or consider a redesign.

The city centre Liberty Hall site – located on the bank of the River Liffey – was used as a munitions factory during the Easter Rising and a rallying point for a march on the General Post Office.

Gilroy McMahon Architects' scheme to redevelop Liberty Hall in Dublin

REJECTED (November 2012): Gilroy McMahon Architects’ scheme to redevelop Liberty Hall in Dublin

 

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