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Hopkins' Greenwich plan rejected

Hopkins has failed to win planning permission for its contentious Greenwich Market proposals

Despite backing from UNESCO and English Heritage, the proposals for the new market were thrown out by the planning committee. The Greenwich Market scheme has been criticised by groups such as the Victorian Society who object to the proposed demolition of many period features of the building.

The Greenwich Market is part of one of four UNESCO World Heritage Sites in London.

The proposed revamp featured a mixed-use development including shops, offices, a hotel and a new market to replace the existing building. The development would have centred around a new courtyard with a ‘new translucent canopy roof to give the market a brighter and more contemporary feel’ although an objector at the meeting described the feature as ‘like Bluewater’ and ‘a gift to pigeons.’

Planning was only applied for in April 2009, three years after Hopkins was awarded the job.

The Council received nearly 900 letters of objection to the scheme and the planning meeting was attended by around 100 members of the public. The council leader, Cllr Chris Roberts, a member of the planning board, said at the meeting: “I simply don’t believe the design is good enough for the World Heritage Site. I am not convinced it would create a place I would want to spend time in.”

Commenting after the decision, Martin Sands, director of Greenwich Hospital, said: ’We are all very disappointed that after three years of planning and support from many local stakeholders that the members of the planning board last night were unable to support the market regeneration plans.’

‘Despite this setback, we remain committed to Greenwich Market and will continue to support our stallholders and shops in the market through our Shop Greenwich campaign and in other ways.’

Hopkins declined to comment.

 

 

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