By continuing to use the site you agree to our Privacy & Cookies policy

Goodbye towers, hello low-rise: LDS reveals fresh Hammersmith revamp plans

Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands has revealed new low-rise redevelopment plans for Hammersmith – nearly a year after skyscraper plans by Sheppard Robson for the same site were abandoned

The west London-based practice was appointed to revamp the area surrounding Hammersmith’s Grade II-listed Town Hall in November after the previous scheme was ditched following concerns over height.

The office-led King Street Regeneration project is a joint venture between Grainger and Helical Bar working as development partner for Hammersmith and Fulham council.

The previous architect Sheppard Robson won planning permission to replace Hammersmith Town Hall’s 1970s extension and other buildings with a new public square and 290 homes in December 2011. But the project was abandoned by the council in July 2012.  Residents had argued the 15-storey scheme would ruin the district’s skyline.

Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands was appointed to draw up fresh plans under a revised brief set by the council which banned any development above eight storeys.

The council also halved the amount of office space to 4,200m² and abandoned controversial plans for a new bridge over the nearby A4 Talgarth Road into Furnivall Gardens.

Alex Lifschutz of the studio said: ‘For the last few months we’ve been having productive meetings with the local community and stakeholders.

‘Giving these groups a voice in the design and planning process is integral to the project to make sure the emerging scheme responds to the needs of Hammersmith and those who live and work there.

‘The public exhibition was an opportunity for people to provide further comment and feedback before we submit our planning application to London Borough of Hammersmith & Fulham this summer.’

 



Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment.

Related Jobs

Sign in to see the latest jobs relevant to you!

The searchable digital buildings archive with drawings from more than 1,500 projects

AJ newsletters