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Carmody Groarke unveils UK tsunami memorial

Carmody Groarke‘s memorial for the UK victims of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami will be officially opened by Prince Charles and The Duchess of Cornwall later today (6 July)

Dedicated to the 151 UK citizens who died in the Boxing Day tsunami, the 3.75 m3 granite monolith sits in the Darwin Centre garden outside the Natural History Museum in London.

The stone, which weighs 115 tonnes, was quarried from Les Carrières Plo near Toulouse, France.

The scheme received a £550,000 grant from the Department of Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and was the ‘product of months of dialogue between the bereaved families, survivors and the design team of Carmody Groarke and M3 Consulting’.

Practice founders Kevin Carmody and Andy Groarke, who also designed the London 7/7 memorial, said: ‘Our collective intention was to make a fitting, engaging and unique memorial - a place for contemplation and remembering for generations to come. Our goal was also to give the memorial stone a strong architectural relationship between the bold buildings and landscape of the Natural History Museum.’

Michael Holland, Chairman of the Memorial Project Board, said: ‘The 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami was one of the worst natural disasters in living memory, hundreds of thousands of people lost their lives. The impact of the devastation was felt across the world. This huge, singular geographical fragment will create a powerful reminder for generations to come of this momentous event within the Earth’s natural history. Its purpose is to stop people forgetting. Within this new public space, the Memorial also offers a place for more quiet contemplation.

‘“We are immensely grateful to the DCMS for funding the memorial and to the Natural History Museum for making space available in its grounds – we can think of no better place to remember the lives of the UK family members and the over 225,000 others who perished in the Tsunami.’

Previous story (AJ 28.10.10)

Carmody Groarke unveils UK tsunami memorial designs

Carmody Groarke has today revealed its design for a memorial for the UK victims of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami

Backed by Tsunami Support UK (TSUK), the granite monolith will sit in the Darwin Centre garden at the Natural History Museum.

The scheme has received a £550,000 grant from the Department of Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and is expected complete next Spring (2011).  

The huge, single geological fragment will create a powerful reminder for generations to come of this a momentous event within the Earth’s natural history.

Michael Holland, chairman of the Memorial Project Board, described the memorial as a ‘huge, single geological fragment’ which ‘will create a powerful reminder for generations to come’. He added:’“The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was one of the worst natural disasters in living memory, hundreds of thousands of people lost their lives and the impact of the devastation was felt across the world.

‘The design of the memorial reflects the views and feelings of UK survivors and bereaved families and is the product of months of dialogue between them and our wonderful design team of Carmody Groarke and M3 Consulting.’

He concluded: ‘We are immensely grateful to the DCMS for funding the memorial and to the Natural History Museum for making space available in its grounds – we can think of no better place to remember the lives of the 151 UK citizens who perished in the tsunami”.

Practice founders Kevin Carmody and Andy Groarke, who also designed the London 7/7 memorial (pictured right), said: ‘Our collective intention is to make a fitting, engaging and unique memorial - a place for contemplation and remembering for generations to come.’

Dr Michael Dixon, Director of the Natural History Museum, said: ‘Making sense of the natural world is an important part of the Natural History Museum’s mission and I hope this memorial will not only bring comfort to those who lost loved ones in the tsunami but also be a reminder to us all of the sometimes destructive force nature can be.’

Previous story (24.06.10)

Carmody Groarke to design UK tsunami memorial

The architect behind London’s 7/7 memorial (pictured), Carmody Groarke, has been selected to design the memorial for the UK victims of the 2004 Tsunami

The £550,000 memorial, which is being funded by the Department of Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and backed by Tsunami Support UK (TSUK), will be built in the grounds of the Natural History Museum in London outside CF Møller’s Darwin Centre.

The practice will work alongside property development managers M3 Consulting on the project which is expected to be completed sometime next year.

Michael Holland, chairman of the TSUK Memorial Project Board, said: ‘M3 Consulting has been responsible for delivering complex and high profile projects on time and on budget while Carmody Groarke is a wonderful architectural studio with an impressive record of designing for public spaces.

‘We have been particularly struck by the approach the team takes to answering the design brief and the extent to which they involve the client – in our case the survivors and bereaved families of the tsunami – in the design process.’

The designs will be unveiled early next year.

The Asian tsunami on 26 December 2004 claimed the lives of 149 people who were either British citizens or had close links to the UK.

Readers' comments (2)

  • Nice open selection process then Richard.

    Unsuitable or offensive?

  • Can we have a memorial to all cancer sufferers? My father has cancer and has 3 months to live. It will be a long and painful death. Can we have a memorial to cancer? My school friend was horrifically killed in a car accident at the age of 17, can we have a memorial to that? Can we have a memorial to all the babies that died a premature death?

    This was a tragic event – but everyone is mortal and will die sometime. Many other people died on the same day from a range of other causes – but they have no memorial.

    Why these people? Please someone tell me.

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