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Cadogan's Janice Renowden: ‘We work with the best’

Cadogan estate improvement manager Janice Renowden on procuring architects for new public realm and retail projects in Chelsea

What is Cadogan’s vision for Sloane Street?

We want to strengthen and reinforce its position as one of the world’s leading luxury retail destinations, offering an environment that reflects the elegance, exclusivity and uniqueness of the location.

What regeneration projects are you working on currently in Sloane Street?

Our largest and most exciting scheme is the redevelopment of 131 Sloane Street by Stiff + Trevillion. The new six-storey building will provide 12,702m² of offices and shops. Six large shops will face onto Sloane Street, with a piazza and restaurant to the rear surrounded by smaller shops to provide a more of a ‘village’ fee.

How did you choose the architect?
We invited a shortlist of six practices to submit proposals and were delighted to select Stiff + Trevillion.

Do you plan to recruit more?
The Cadogan Estate extends across 38ha in Chelsea and Knightsbridge. We adopt a long-term approach to development and have a continuous programme of redevelopments and refurbishments. We work with a range of architects, seeking to engage the very best for the challenges and opportunities of each particular job and, where appropriate, we run competitive pitches. We ran an architectural competition for the Cadogan café and we are now working with NEX Architects – which was selected unanimously by an independent panel against fierce competition from a shortlist of six selected from 147 entries.

NEX Architecture's competition-winning scheme for a £2 million café in Duke of York Square on London’s King’s Road [December 2012]

NEX Architecture’s competition-winning scheme for a £2 million café in Duke of York Square on London’s King’s Road [December 2012]

Which new retail and public realm projects inspire you?
One of the inspirations for the piazza at 131 Sloane Street was Corso Como in Milan, which is a vibrant, enclosed square with luscious vegetation. The large-scale elegant treatments in major developments like King’s Cross and St Pancras are really inspiring. So too are the small and very effective schemes that have brought formerly peripheral locations such as Seymour Place and New Quebec Street in Marylebone to prominence.

Has planning reform made urban regeneration any easier?
The National Planning Policy Framework has done much to reduce the planning system’s complexities and enhance its legibility. This is very welcome. However, urban regeneration and development in the heart of a city like London will never be easy, due to the sheer density of activity that needs to be accommodated and the intense competition between uses. The expectations of the planning system, of planners themselves and of developers to make all of this work have never been higher.

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