By continuing to use the site you agree to our Privacy & Cookies policy

Adjaye's $60m Harlem affordable homes close to completion

Work is nearing completion on Adjaye Associates £50million, 124-home Sugar Hill affordable housing scheme in Harlem, New York

The scheme is the first of a number of high-profile American projects David Adjaye’s practice is set to complete in the coming years. The practice’s contest-winning design for the National Museum of African American History and Culture is due to open in 2016 and the firm is also working on an arts centre for Colgate University in New York.

As well as flats, the 13-storey Harlem scheme includes a children’s museum and pre-school at ground and first floor levels. The 1,675m2 Children’s Museum of Art and Storytelling contains exhibition and performance spaces and a studio for an artist-in-residence.

The building steps back at the ninth storey creating a 3m terrace and cantilever at opposite sides.

Clad in rose embossed graphite-tinted pre-cast panels, the building pays tribute to the culture and history of Harlem, referencing the surrounding houses which sit within the area’s ‘heritage rose’ district.

Adjaye Associates' Sugar Hill housing scheme

Adjaye Associates’ Sugar Hill housing scheme

Project data

Location Harlem, New York 
Type of project affordable housing 
Client Broadway Housing Communities 
Architect David Adjaye Architects 
Architect of record SLCE Architects
Main contractor Mountco Construction and Development
Landscape architect Rader + Crews
Structural engineer Ysrael A. Seinuk
M&E engineer Rodkin Cardinale
Façade consultant Israel Berger & Associates
LEED consultant Steve Winters Associates 
Start on site date May 2012
Completion date June 2014
Gross internal floor area 17,745m²
Total cost $59.2million
Specific environmental target LEED Silver

Adjaye Associates' Sugar Hill housing scheme

Adjaye Associates’ Sugar Hill housing scheme

Previous story (AJ 24.07.14)

Work starts on Adjaye’s affordable homes in Harlem

Construction has started on Adjaye Associates’ 124-home Sugar Hill affordable housing scheme in Harlem, New York

The £50 million, 13-storey residential project will sit above an early education centre for 100 pre-school children and their families and the Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art & Storytelling

Due to complete in late 2013, the development for Broadway Housing Communities has been described as a ‘dark slab’ crowing a 23m-tall, glass-and-terrazzo base.

According to the practice, the development ‘steps back at the ninth floor to create a 3m-terrace and cantilever on opposite sides’ and will feature rose embossed pre-cast panels.

David Adjaye said: ‘Sugar Hill represents a new social engagement, which is at the heart of my practice. It is a symbol of regeneration for the community of Harlem that will integrate housing with a cultural and educational element - this is a real reinvention of the traditional model and I am thrilled to see the project break ground.’

Adjaye Associates’ Sugar Hill affordable housing scheme breaks ground today at a ceremony attended by New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, community representatives, benefactors, elected officials and city and state commissioners (July 2012).

Readers' comments (4)

  • Whatever you think of the architectural aesthetic, one of the most interesting things about this social development is the 3,500 sq ft urban farm on the roof. This follows Brooklyn Grange's 2.5 acres of roof farms in Queens and Brooklyn and responds to NYC's policy for green roofs, to help cool this hot city and manage storm water - as well as being a source of income and produce for the people living there. Roof farms are hugely popular in NYC now, due to lack of growing space at ground level and the rising cost of food. Maybe we'll see more of this in the UK too?

    Unsuitable or offensive?

  • I think the headline in wrong. It should read "$60 million prison close to completion."

    Unsuitable or offensive?

  • Agree. Looks very unappetizing. Can't see film stars moving in!

    Unsuitable or offensive?

  • It does look like a rather frobidding edifice for social housing. Lighten up David -all those rose embossed graphite tinted walls look too severe -why no balconies to soften the cubular mass -which suits the latest architectural monochromatic minimalist trends -but shows a lack of appeal to the masses and the softening of a harsh environment.
    Though the roof farm is good -why not dangle some trellises down the building for some greenery to trail down?

    Unsuitable or offensive?

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment.

Related Jobs

Sign in to see the latest jobs relevant to you!

The searchable digital buildings archive with drawings from more than 1,500 projects

AJ newsletters