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Chris Medland's Comments

  • Comment on: Gehry: 'I want to work with a local firm on Battersea'

    Chris Medland's comment 8-Apr-2014 2:07 pm

    Dear Frank, As a local Battersea practice we would be delighted to discuss how we can assist with your project at Battersea Power Station. Contact details available at www.one-worlddesign.co.uk I look forward to your call Chris

  • Comment on: Prince’s Foundation: ‘Mansion blocks not towers will solve housing crisis'

    Chris Medland's comment 27-Mar-2014 4:18 pm

    variety is the spice of life - there is no one size fits all

  • Comment on: Architects ‘squeezed out of middle class’

    Chris Medland's comment 19-Feb-2014 9:13 am

    I cant help but think that over the next ten years, unless fees rise back to historic percentages, that the mix of long hours, average pay and (due to house prices) long commutes will lead to large practices having a shortfall in quality staff availability (people with 10 years experience who want to start a family for example). This will probably lead to the creation of satellite offices on the main access routes within earshot of London in places like Guildford, Milton Keynes and Brighton which will take on more and more of the work with lower overheads and less time spent commuting. This will be made all the easier by advances in remote data exchange over the web and superfast broadband.

  • Comment on: Clegg: ‘We must bite the bullet and create garden cities’

    Chris Medland's comment 21-Jan-2014 4:47 pm

    Is this the same Yalding in Kent that has consistently flooded in recent years? Hmmm. I would also reiterate what I said in September last year - There are 22.0 million private homes in the UK serving a population of 60.5 million people. On that basis there are 2.75 people per house. If London requires 809,000 homes by 2021 this means that the current bed space shortfall plus the expected increase in population over the next 8 years is approximately 2 ¼ million people. If all the funding and policies are put in place then the most optimistic prediction means that of those people some 368,500 will be housed by the London Councils. This means that nearly 1.9million people will need to be housed by other means. Say we are lucky and 10% of these people are accommodated by extensions and alterations to existing housing stock in London, and another 10% are accommodated outside London by improvements to existing housing stock and commute in, there are still 1.5 million people unaccounted for. Now we look at brown field sites within the M25, let’s be cautious and say that there are enough viable sites to house a further 500,000 people in 200,000 new privately funded homes for sale or build to lets developments. We are still left with 1 million people to house - we need to build two whole new cities the size of Bristol within commuting distance of London. Perhaps 4 smaller cities, north, south, east and west of London. Given that cross rail will be complete I would suggest one to the west near Maidenhead or Reading and another near Shenfield or further out into Essex, or close to the M11, Stevenage could be expanded to the north and Crawley to the south. Let’s get busy…

  • Comment on: Speculative Diamond Jubilee Bridge gets planning go-ahead

    Chris Medland's comment 22-Nov-2013 12:56 pm

    Dear Robert, There are 5 river channels as defined by the arches of the existing railway structure. All 5 channels are navigable and must remain so. Due to the manoeuvring and access requirements of boats at Imperial Wharf Marina and Albion Quay, along with the Environment Agency’s concerns relating to any effects on the ecology of the intertidal mud flats, a two river pier solution is required. For the full description of the constraints and issues please refer to the design and access statement available at http://www.public-access.lbhf.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?activeTab=documents&keyVal=MCVILTBIGX000 thanks

  • Comment on: How to succeed in work/life after children in architecture

    Chris Medland's comment 9-Oct-2013 1:59 pm

    I would like to add further to Rogers point. In some instances for those of us with a wife/partner with a successful career in the non architectural world, given the relatively low pay in our profession and high childcare costs, it wouldn't take much of a shift in the balance for it not to be worthwhile for the father to return to work as an architect, but instead look after the family and support the wife/partner in their role.

  • Comment on: Helen Lucas unwraps highland home

    Chris Medland's comment 9-Oct-2013 9:52 am

    lovely. would like to stay there for a week or two

  • Comment on: London needs 800,000 new homes by 2021

    Chris Medland's comment 17-Sep-2013 2:05 pm

    There are 22.0 million private homes in the UK serving a population of 60.5 million people. On that basis there are 2.75 people per house. If London requires 809,000 homes by 2021 this means that the current bed space shortfall plus the expected increase in population over the next 8 years is approximately 2 ¼ million people. Taking the report at face value, if all the funding and policies are put in place then the most optimistic prediction means that of those people some 368,500 will be housed by the London Councils. This means that nearly 1.9million people will need to be housed by other means. Say we are lucky and 10% of these people are accommodated by extensions and alterations to existing housing stock in London, and another 10% are accommodated outside London by improvements to existing housing stock and commute in, there are still 1.5 million people unaccounted for. Now we look at brown field sites within the M25, let’s be cautious and say that there are enough viable sites to house a further 500,000 people in 200,000 new privately funded homes for sale or build to lets developments. We are still left with 1 million people to house - we need to build two whole new cities the size of Bristol within commuting distance of London. Perhaps 4 smaller cities, north, south, east and west of London. Given that cross rail will be complete I would suggest one to the west near Maidenhead or Reading and another near Shenfield or further out into Essex, or close to the M11, Stevenage could be expanded to the north and Crawley to the south. Let’s get busy…

  • Comment on: Architecture for Humanity co-founders step down

    Chris Medland's comment 9-Sep-2013 1:10 pm

    Cameron and Kate inspired me and the other founding trustees of what was AFH UK (now AFH London) to get involved and do our bit a decade ago. I have had the pleasure of meeting Cameron on several occasions and once stepped in to wholly insufficiently 'fill his shoes' when he could not give a talk at an event at the Design Museum. He is a great orator, has endless optimism and a passion for doing the right thing whatever it takes. Together Kate and Cameron have made a real difference not only to people's lives but also to the perception of what architects can do for the benefit of others. In the eyes of many they have made architects human again, and for many volunteers the balance that worthy work can bring to the commercial realities of a high pressured office yields many dividends. It is high time that their work was suitably recognised (MBE?, Cameron is English after all) and I am sure that they both will continue to have a positive influence for the greater good in whatever field they focus their efforts.

  • Comment on: Pitman Tozer unwraps Notting Hill terrace revamp

    Chris Medland's comment 9-Aug-2013 8:30 am

    very nice indeed.

  • Comment on: Government announces new Part L changes

    Chris Medland's comment 30-Jul-2013 2:55 pm

    Although I welcome progress in sustainability standards it is pointless if the Government continue giving tax incentives for shale gas fracking. Making the national grid carbon neutral and sustainable is the only way to really secure our energy future

  • Comment on: Zero carbon roadmap warns of ‘dangerous’ climate change

    Chris Medland's comment 16-Jul-2013 6:09 pm

    Zero Carbon Grid = Good (but currently is not going to be achieved as Shale Gas burning power stations looks like the governments favoured option). European Zero Energy design standards 2020 programme = Good (take the emphasis off carbon and make it about not needing any energy as we can’t rely on the Grid being decarbonised). SAP calculations and CfSH focus on airtightness and high insulation, in our view = misguided bordering on BAD. Reason: Climate change is happening now, the UK is getting hotter and the buildings we design now need to be future proofed now. The average temperature in the UK will have risen by 6 degrees by 2100, with an expected 30 very hot days a year. The majority of the remaining days will be mild and very few extremely cold. Do you see airtight homes in Southern France, Spain, Portugal or Italy? This is the type of climate heading our way. The reason for this, as we are all experiencing this week, is natural ventilation and the ability to loose heat and not gain too much of it. The standards now are shaped for heat retention and minimal air flow – these homes will need air conditioning in years to come. The balance between retaining heat and having the ability to shed it (in a zero energy, passive, way) has perhaps gone too far?

  • Comment on: Debbie Flevotomou wins Battersea spiritual centre contest

    Chris Medland's comment 10-Jan-2013 2:36 pm

    congratulations Debbie, some beautiful renderings

  • Comment on: Housing registrations plummet 12%

    Chris Medland's comment 30-Nov-2012 9:22 am

    Fewer ‘ugly’ new homes perhaps? The problem with the ‘ugly’ issue is not in the design, it is in the procurement, tenure and brief. With the necessary raising of sustainability standards the issues of cost, quality and time are going to become even more challenging. All the ingredients of the solution to the housing shortfall and impending crisis are being lined up reasonably well by the current government but in a drip feed fashion. A key part of the solution is build-to-let. Pension funds have billions to invest for long term returns; therefore our design briefs will inherently have whole life cycle costing embedded within them rather than a short term view that arguably spec build developers have (for valid economic reasons). This will lead to prioritising good, durable and sustainable design which will need to maximise opportunities for renewables whilst minimising energy consumption. Buildings will inherently be more future proof because it will be in the interest of the landlord for them to be so. This means that we all have to accept that home ownership, at least for now, may no longer be the norm for the most people. A change in the way we view the housing market in the UK is what is required and It will take time for people to come round to the idea. The stigma of renting rather than home ownership needs to be washed aside for the benefit of all. In this day and age is seems fitting to shed antiquated ideas of Englishmen and castles and let what you do and who you are be a measure of your success rather than where you live and if you own your home.

  • Comment on: MH Architects design West Sussex Passivhaus development

    Chris Medland's comment 19-Nov-2012 4:08 pm

    great work.

  • Comment on: Reed: Government says there are too many architects

    Chris Medland's comment 7-Nov-2012 9:15 am

    maybe there are too many politicians?

  • Comment on: Shapero reveals new plans for 'cruciform' Liverpool skyscraper

    Chris Medland's comment 23-Oct-2012 1:49 pm

    Christianity is represented in all its forms in Liverpool, and with the cities obvious historic and cultural links to Ireland and Catholicism perhaps no city in the UK could claim to be any more Christian. However, is the use of such a powerful symbol suitable in anything other than a place of worship. It seems to me that the architect here just intends to shock and cause debate for the sake of it – which is of course fine – but ultimately the building is a commercial venture, not one of religion. There is nothing wrong with making money or some people having more than others, but the use of such a powerful symbol being associated with commerce is careless to say the least. If such a scheme achieved planning consent it would be a failure of the planning system and demonstrate a lack of understanding of the importance of symbolism in architecture and when it is appropriate to reference such symbols.

  • Comment on: Competitions: Editor's Pick, 04.10.12

    Chris Medland's comment 10-Oct-2012 5:35 pm

    Following an afternoon of about turns, sharp lefts and then 180 rotations by the organisers of the Fort Albert competition (as well as their publication of all the names of those who were set to submit entries), isn't it about time that some kind of framework for competitions was set up. Just thinking out loud, but surely the RIBA should be the body through which competitions are organised and they should organise them to absolutely minimise the completely unnecessary time wasting and abortive work which is costing the profession £100,000's and many lost evenings and weekends for very little (if any) net return. I would suggest that in most cases the only consultants that really make a profit from competitions are those that organise them and they are incentivised to retrieve as much free work and intellectual property from as many architects as possible. What other profession tolerates this on such a scale, hard times or otherwise?

  • Comment on: Revealed: Fletcher Priest wins High Line contest with 'low line' scheme

    Chris Medland's comment 10-Oct-2012 2:09 pm

    I still think our green roofed bus shelter/pocket parks for insects flora and fauna idea is better...http://www.one-worlddesign.co.uk/2012/09/25/high-line-competition/ Though I might be biased…

  • Comment on: Starchitects think journalists should toe the line

    Chris Medland's comment 6-Sep-2012 8:47 am

    It is possible that in 4 years the UK will only be made up of 3 countries. With the planned vote north of the border, who is in line to design the Scottish Pavilion? This fractious issue in itself gives a clue as to one possible sub text to any UK pavilion.

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